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Curcumin Extreme

Curcumin Extreme

Price  $41.95
Cashback$0.84
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There are many curcumin products on the market, but Curcumin Extreme with BCM-95® has superior bioavailability and absorption. BCM-95 contains the natural spectrum of the turmeric rhizome and is 100 percent natural. Curcumin Extreme promotes liver ...
Single Bottle (30 Servings)
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Curcumin Extreme

There are many curcumin products on the market, but Curcumin Extreme with BCM-95® has superior bioavailability and absorption. BCM-95 contains the natural spectrum of the turmeric rhizome and is 100 percent natural. Curcumin Extreme promotes liver detoxification, promotes healthy glutathione levels and normal cellular regeneration. Taking Curcumin Extreme every day can help detoxify impurities in your body that build up over time.* 

Curcumin Extreme also includes 167 mg of broccoli seed extract, a powerful source of sulphoraphane glucosinolates. Sulforaphanes support the normal production of Phase II liver detoxification enzymes, including glutathione synthase, heme-oxygenase and catalase. Sulforaphanes also support gene transcription, the process by which genetic information is copied from DNA to RNA. They also support the body’s natural defense systems. Glutathione is the master antioxidant in the human body, which serves to preserve and protect the brain and other body tissues by protecting them from the damage of free radicals. Furthermore, glutathione recycles vitamins C and E, which are also powerful antioxidants.*


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FAQ
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  • Bhattacharyya, S., et al. Curcumin prevents tumor-induced T cell apoptosis through Stat-5a-mediated Bcl-2 induction. Journal of Biological Chemistry. 282(22): 15954-15964.
  • Biswas, S., et al. Curcumin induces glutathione biosynthesis and inhibits NF-kappaB activation and interleukin-8 release in alveolar epithelial cells: mechanism of free radical scavenging activity. Antioxidants and Redox Signaling. 7(1-2): 32-41, 2005.
  • Cheng, Y., et al. Effects of curcumin on peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma expression and nuclear translocation/redistribution in culture-activated rat hepatic stellate cells. Chinese Medical Journal. 120(9): 794-801, 2007.
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  • Dairam, A., et al. Curcuminoids, curcumin, and demethoxycurcumin reduce lead-induced memory deficits in male Wistar rats. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. 55(3): 1039-1044, 2007.
  • Dickinson, D., et al. Curcumin alters EpRE and AP-1 binding complexes and elevates glutamate-cysteine ligase gene expression. FASEB. 17(3): 473-475, 2003.
  • Fahey, J., et al. Sulforaphane inhibits extracellular, intracellular, and antibiotic-resistant strains of Helicobacter pylori and prevents benzo[a]pyrene-induced stomach tumors. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. 99(11): 7610-7615, 2002.
  • Farombi, E., et al. Curcumin attenuates dimethylnitrosamine-induced liver injury in rats through Nrf2-mediated induction of heme oxygenase-1. Food and Chemical Toxicology. 46(4): 1279-1287, 2008.
  • Funk, J., et al. Turmeric extracts containing curcuminoids prevent experimental rheumatoid arthritis. Journal of Natural Products. 69(3): 351-355, 2006.
  • Gao, X. and Talalay, P. Induction of phase 2 genes by sulforaphane protects retinal pigment epithelial cells against photooxidative damage. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. 101(28): 10446-10451, 2004.
  • Garcia-Alloza, M., et al. Curcumin labels amyloid pathology in vivo, disrupts existing plaques, and partially restores distorted neurites in an Alzheimer mouse model. Journal of Neurochemistry. 102(4): 1095-1104, 2007.
  • Higdon, J., et al. Cruciferous vegetables and human cancer risk: epidemiologic evidence and mechanistic basis. Pharmacological Research. 55(3): 224-236, 2007.
  • Howells, L., et al. Comparison of oxaliplatin- and curcumin-mediated antiproliferative effects in colorectal cell lines. International Journal of Cancer. 121(1): 175-183, 2007.
  • Jagetia, G. and Aggarwal, B. "Spicing up" of the immune system by curcumin. Journal of Clinical Immunology. 27(1): 19-35, 2007.
  • Johnson, J., et al. Curcumin for chemoprevention of colon cancer. Cancer Letters. 255(2): 170-181, 2007.
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  • Kaur, G., et al. Inhibition of oxidative stress and cytokine activity by curcumin in amelioration of endotoxin-induced experimental hepatoxicity in rodents. Clinical and Experimental Immunology. 145(2): 313-321, 2006.
  • Kim, G., et al. Curcumin inhibits immunostimulatory function of dendritic cells: MAPKs and translocation of NF-kappa B as potential targets. Journal of Immunology. 174(12): 8116-8124, 2005.
  • Kurup, V., et al. Immune response modulation by curcumin in a latex allergy model. Clinical and Molecular Allergy. 5: 1, 2007.
  • Lim, G., et al. The curry spice curcumin reduces oxidative damage and amyloid pathology in an Alzheimer transgenic mouse. Journal of Neuroscience. 21(21): 8370-8377, 2001.
  • Lin, J. Molecular targets of curcumin. Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology. 595: 227-243, 2007.
  • Magalska, A., et al. Curcumin induces cell death without oligonucleosomal DNA fragmentation in quiescent and proliferating human CD8+ cells. Acta Biochimica Polonica. 53(3): 531-538, 2006.
  • Maheshwari, R., et al. Multiple biological activities of curcumin: a short review. Life Sciences. 78(18): 2081-2087, 2006.
  • Mathuria, N. and Verma, R. Ameliorative effect of curcumin on aflatoxin-induced toxicity in DNA, RNA and protein in liver and kidney of mice. Acta Poloniae Pharmaceutica. 64(6): 497-502, 2007.
  • Monograph. Curcuma longa (turmeric). Alternative Medicine Review. 6(suppl): S62-S66, 2001.
  • Morimitsu, Y., et al. A sulforaphane analogue that potently activates the Nrf2-dependent detoxification pathway. Journal of Biological Chemistry. 277(5): 3456-3463, 2002.
  • Myzak, M. and Dashwood, R. Chemoprotection by sulforaphane: keep one eye beyond Keap1. Cancer Letters. 233(2): 208-218, 2006.
  • Myzak, M., et al. Sulforaphane inhibits histone deacetylase in vivo and suppresses tumorigenesis in Apc-minus mice. FASEB. 20(3): 506-508, 2006.
  • Naik, R., et al. Protection of liver cells from ethanol cytotoxicity by curcumin in liver slice culture in vitro. Journal of Ethnopharmacology. 95(1): 31-37, 2004.
  • Nanji, A., et al. Curcumin prevents alcohol-induced liver disease in rats by inhibiting the expression of NF-kappa B-dependent genes. American Journal of Physiology. 284(2): G321-G327, 2003.
  • Ng, T., et al. Curry consumption and cognitive function in the elderly. American Journal of Epidemiology. 164(9): 898-906, 2006.
  • Nishinaka, T., et al. Curcumin activates human glutathione S-transferase P1 expression through antioxidant response element. Toxicology Letters. 170(3): 238-247, 2007.
  • Noyan-Ashraf, M., et al. Dietary approach to decrease aging-related CNS inflammation. Nutritional Neuroscience. 8(2): 101-110, 2005.
  • O’Connell, M. and Rushworth, S. Curcumin: potential for hepatic fibrosis therapy? British Journal of Pharmacology. 153(3): 403-405, 2007.
  • Osawa, T. Nephroprotective and hepatoprotective effects of curcuminoids. Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology. 595: 407-423, 2007.
  • Pal, S., et al. Amelioration of immune cell number depletion and potentiation of depressed detoxification system of tumor-bearing mice by curcumin. Cancer Detection and Prevention. 29(5): 470-478, 2005.
  • Pari, L. and Amali, D. Protective role of tetrahydrocurcumin (THC) an active principle of turmeric on chloroquine induced hepatotoxicity in rats. Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences. 8(1): 115-123, 2005.
  • Perkins, S., et al. Chemopreventive efficacy and pharmacokinetics of curcumin in the min/+ mouse, a model of familial adenomatous polyposis. Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers, and Prevention. 11(6): 535-540, 2002.
  • Rushworth, S., et al. Role of protein kinase C delta in curcumin-induced antioxidant response element-mediated gene expression in human monocytes. Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications. 341(4): 1007-1016, 2006.
  • Salvioli, S., et al. Curcumin in cell death processes: A challenge for CAM of age-related pathologies. Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine. 4(2): 181-190, 2007.
  • Scapagnini, G., et al. Curcumin activates defensive genes and protects neurons against oxidative stress. Antioxidants and Redox Signaling. 8(3-4): 395-403, 2006.
  • Shen, G., et al. Modulation of nuclear factor E2-related factor 2-mediated gene expression in mice liver and small intestine by cancer chemopreventive agent curcumin. Molecular and Cancer Therapeutics. 5(1): 39-51, 2006.
  • Shen, S., et al. Protective effect of curcumin against liver warm ischemia/reperfusion injury in rat model is associated with regulation of heat shock protein and antioxidant enzymes. World Journal of Gastroenterology. 13(13): 1953-1961, 2007.
  • Shishodia, S., et al. Curcumin: getting back to the roots. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences. 1056: 206-217, 2005.
  • Shu, J., et al. The study of therapeutic effects of curcumin on hepatic fibrosis and variation of correlated cytokine. Journal of Chinese Medicinal Materials. 30(11): 1421-1425, 2007.
  • Shu, J., et al. Therapeutic effects of curcumin treatment on hepatic fibrosis. Chinese Journal of Hepatology. 15(10): 753-757, 2007.
  • Shukla, P., et al. Protective effect of curcumin against lead neurotoxicity in rat. Human and Experimental Toxicology. 22(12): 653-658, 2003.
  • Smith, T., et al. Allyl-isothiocyanate causes mitotic block, loss of cell adhesion and disrupted cytoskeletal structure in HT29 cells. Carcinogenesis. 25(8): 1409-1415, 2004.
  • Srinivasan, M., et al. Protective effect of curcumin on gamma-radiation induced DNA damage and lipid peroxidation in cultured human lymphocytes. Mutation Research. 611(1-2): 96-103, 2006.
  • Tang, L., et al. Potent activation of mitochondria-mediated apoptosis and arrest in S and M phases of cancer cells by a broccoli sprout extract. Molecular Cancer Therapeutics. 5(4): 935-944, 2006.
  • Thangapazham, R., et al. Multiple molecular targets in cancer chemoprevention by curcumin. AAPS Journal. 8(3): E443-E449, 2006.
  • Thejass, P. and Kuttan, G. Antimetastatic activity of Sulforaphane. Life Sciences. 78(26): 3043-3050, 2006.
  • Thejass, P. and Kuttan, G. Augmentation of natural killer cell and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity in BALB/c mice by sulforaphane, a naturally occurring isothiocyanate from broccoli through enhanced production of cytokines IL-2 and IFN-gamma. Immunopharmacology and Immunotoxicology. 28(3): 443-457, 2006.
  • Thejass, P. and Kuttan, G. Immunomodulatory activity of Sulforaphane, a naturally occurring isothiocyanate from broccoli (Brassica oleracea). Phytomedicine. 14(7-8): 538-545, 2007.
  • Wakabayashi, N., et al. Protection against electrophile and oxidant stress by induction of the phase 2 response: fate of cysteines of the Keap1 sensor modified by inducers. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. 101(7): 2040-2045, 2004.
  • Wei, Q., et al. Inhibition of lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation in rat liver mitochondria by curcumin and its analogues. Biochimica et Biophysica Acta. 1760(1): 70-77, 2006.
  • Wu, A., et al. Dietary curcumin counteracts the outcome of traumatic brain injury on oxidative stress, synaptic plasticity, and cognition. 197(2): 309-317, 2006.
  • Xu, Y., et al. Curcumin reverses the effects of chronic stress on behavior, the HPA axis, BDNF expression and phosphorylation of CREB. Brain Research. 1122(1): 56-64, 2006.
  • Yadav, V., et al. Immunomodulatory effects of curcumin. Immunopharmacology and Immunotoxicology. 27(3): 485-497, 2005.
  • Yang, F., et al. Curcumin inhibits formation of amyloid beta oligomers and fibrils, binds plaques, and reduces amyloid in vivo. Journal of Biological Chemistry. 280(7): 5892-5901, 2005.
  • Ye, S., et al. Effect of curcumin on the induction of glutathione S-transferases and NADP(H):quinone oxidoreductase and its possible mechanism of action. Acta Pharmaceutica Sinica. 42(4): 376-380, 2007.
  • Zhang, L., et al. Curcuminoids enhance amyloid-beta uptake by macrophages of Alzheimer's disease patients. Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease. 10(1): 1-7, 2006.
  • Zheng, S. and Chen, A. Curcumin suppresses the expression of extracellular matrix genes in activated hepatic stellate cells by inhibiting gene expression of connective tissue growth factor. American Journal of Physiology. 290(5): G883-G893, 2006.
  • Zheng, S. and Chen, A. Disruption of transforming growth factor-beta signaling by curcumin induces gene expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma in rat hepatic stellate cells. American Journal of Physiology. 292(1): G113-G123, 2007.
  • Zheng, S., et al. De novo synthesis of glutathione is a prerequisite for curcumin to inhibit hepatic stellate cell (HSC) activation. Free Radical Biology and Medicine. 43(3): 444-453, 2007.
*These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product(s) is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

REVIEW SNAPSHOT®

by PowerReviews
NutriPhysicalCurcumin Extreme
 
4.8

(based on 13 reviews)

Ratings Distribution

  • 5 Stars

     

    (11)

  • 4 Stars

     

    (2)

  • 3 Stars

     

    (0)

  • 2 Stars

     

    (0)

  • 1 Stars

     

    (0)

100%

of respondents would recommend this to a friend.

Pros

  • Simple to take (8)
  • Acts quickly (3)
  • Boosts energy (3)
  • Produces results (3)

Cons

    Best Uses

    • Daily use (5)
      • Reviewer Profile:
      • Health conscious (5), First time user (4), Regular user (4)

    Reviewed by 13 customers

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    Displaying reviews 1-5

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    (2 of 2 customers found this review helpful)

     
    5.0

    This solved my skin problem!

    By GaryN

    from USA

    Comments about NutriPhysical Curcumin Extreme:

    I have had eczema for most of my life. About 2 years ago, I noticed my skin getting itchy and bumps starting to form first on my arm the spreaading to my face and body. I went to my doctor and they gave me a steroid shot and it worked for a week then it came back. I used topical steroids and it seemed to get worse. The doctor suggested to go to UCSF or Stanford to visit a dermatology specialist. I went to a acupuncturist and that did not work. I took a GeneSNP analysis and found that my body could not detox. So, I self diagnosed myself and read about Curcumin Extreme it says it detoxes the liver. So, I ordered a bottle and started to take 2 capsules a day. Almost immediately I had relief! My itching stopped and my skin started to clear up in a week. Now it has been 6 months and I have not used any topical steroids! I am taking this for the rest of my life! This works!

    (1 of 1 customers found this review helpful)

     
    5.0

    I will buy this product again.

    By I have beef

    from New York, NY

    Comments about NutriPhysical Curcumin Extreme:

    Use daily and feeling great!

    (1 of 1 customers found this review helpful)

     
    5.0

    Detox Your Liver

    By AlanL

    from USA

    Comments about NutriPhysical Curcumin Extreme:

    I love this product because it helps detox my liver. We live in a chemical world and need a product like this to help our liver out.

    (1 of 1 customers found this review helpful)

     
    5.0

    LOVE THIS PRODUCT!

    By AdamB

    from USA

    SHOP CONSULTANT

    Comments about NutriPhysical Curcumin Extreme:

    The main ingredient in this turmeric is wonderful and powerful antioxidant! Helped me with my skin issues I was going to light therapy for and no longer have to! Would recommend this for anyone even for general maintenance and overall good health!

    (1 of 1 customers found this review helpful)

     
    5.0

    Great Product

    By Ella

    from Whitesboro New York

    About Me Health Conscious, Medical Professional, Regular User

    Pros

    • Boosts Energy
    • Good Value
    • Helps Recovery
    • Simple To Take

    Cons

      Best Uses

      • Great morale booster

      Comments about NutriPhysical Curcumin Extreme:

      Take one capsule every day.

      Displaying reviews 1-5

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