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Isotonix® Prenatal Multivitamin

Price  $51.50
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Isotonix Prenatal Activated Multivitamin is an isotonic-capable supplement that delivers metabolically active forms of folic acid and other B-vitamins, in addition to supplying the Recommended Daily Allowance of key vitamins and nutrients needed for an...
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Isotonix® Prenatal Multivitamin

Isotonix Prenatal Activated Multivitamin is an isotonic-capable supplement that delivers metabolically active forms of folic acid and other B-vitamins, in addition to supplying the Recommended Daily Allowance of key vitamins and nutrients needed for an expectant mother. Taking a prenatal multivitamin with the activated forms of vitamins and minerals is important, especially to pregnant women, because it reduces the amount of effort required to activate and use the nutrients. The superior Isotonix delivery system and the activated forms of essential B-vitamins in Isotonix Prenatal Multivitamin provides pregnant women with superior multivitamin benefits without the difficulty of swallowing prenatal tablets.

Isotonix Prenatal Activated Multivitamin contributes to a healthy pregnancy, and supports normal growth and development of a healthy baby. It also promotes a healthy birth weight and helps maintain normal blood pressure during pregnancy. Isotonix Prenatal Activated Multivitamin tastes great and has a soothing, lemon-lime flavor.*

Isotonic, which means “same pressure,” bears the same chemical resemblance of the body’s blood, plasma and tears. All fluids in the body have a certain concentration, referred to as osmotic pressure. The body’s common osmotic pressure, which is isotonic, allows a consistent maintenance of body tissues. In order for a substance to be absorbed and used in the body’s metabolism, it must be transported in an isotonic state.

Isotonix dietary supplements are delivered in an isotonic solution. This means that the body has less work to do in obtaining maximum absorption. The isotonic state of the suspension allows nutrients to pass directly into the small intestine and be rapidly absorbed into the bloodstream. With Isotonix products, little nutritive value is lost, making the absorption of nutrients highly efficient while delivering maximum results.

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Unlike any other prenatal vitamin on the market today, Isotonix Prenatal Activated Multivitamin gives expectant moms everything their bodies need, how they need it. Traditional prenatal vitamins take time and effort to transform nutrients into ways the body can utilize them. Isotonix Prenatal Activated Multivitamin provides what mom and baby need for a healthy pregnancy, delivering vitamins and minerals crucial for a healthy pregnancy in their active forms and in an isotonic state. This allows the nutrients to be delivered faster, easier and more effectively than traditional prenatal vitamins.

Unlike any other prenatal vitamin on the market today, Isotonix Prenatal Activated Multivitamin gives expectant moms everything their bodies need, how they need it. Traditional prenatal vitamins take time and effort to transform nutrients into ways the body can utilize them. Isotonix Prenatal Activated Multivitamin provides what mom and baby need for a healthy pregnancy, delivering vitamins and minerals crucial for a healthy pregnancy in their active forms and in an isotonic state. This allows the nutrients to be delivered faster, easier and more effectively than traditional prenatal vitamins.


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FAQ
FAQ
  • Ryan-Harshman M et al. Folic acid and prevention of neural tube defects. Canadian Family Physician. 54(1):36-8, 2008.
  • Czeizel A et al. Dose-dependent effect of folic acid on the prevention of orofacial clefts. Pediatrics. 104(6):e66, 1999.
  • Ren A et al. Comparison of blood folate levels among pregnant Chinese women in areas with high and low prevalence of neural tube defects. Public Health Nutrition. 10(8):762-8, 2007.
  • Brent R et al. Further efforts to reduce the incidence of neural tube defects. Pediatrics. 119(1):225-6, 2007.
  • Lindsey L et al. Understanding optimal nutrition among women of childbearing age in the United States and Puerto Rico: employing formative research to lay the foundation for national birth defects prevention campaigns. Journal of Health Communication. 12(8):733-57, 2007.
  • Scholl T et al. Folic acid: influence on the outcome of pregnancy. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 71(5 Supplement):1295S-1303S, 2000.
  • Wald N et al. Quantifying the effect of folic acid. Lancet. 358(9298):2069-2073, 2001.
  • Locksmith G et al. Preventing neural tube defects: the importance periconceptional folic acid supplements. Obstetrics and Gynecology. 321(7):1027-1034, 1998.
  • Suarez L et al. Maternal serum B(12) levels and risk for neural tube defects in a Texas-Mexico border population. Annals of Epidemiology. 13(2):81-88, 2003.
  • Candito M et al. Nutritional and genetic determinants of vitamin B and homocysteine metabolisms in neural tube defects: a multicenter case-control study. American Journal of Medical Genetics. 146(9):1128-33, 2008.
  • Boyles A et al. Folate and one-carbon metabolism gene polymorphisms and their associations with oral facial clefts. American Journal of Medical Genetics. 146(4):440-9, 2008.
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Prevalence of neural tube defects and folic acid knowledge and consumption--Puerto Rico, 1996-2006. MMWR Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. 57(1):10-3, 2008.
  • Wilson R et al. Pre-conceptional vitamin/folic acid supplementation 2007: the use of folic acid in combination with a multivitamin supplement for the prevention of neural tube defects and other congenital anomalies. Journal of Obstetrics Gynecology Canada. 29(12):1003-26, 2007.
  • Gupta P et al. Multimicronutrient supplementation for undernourished pregnant women and the birth size of their offspring: a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial. Archives of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine. 161(1):58-64, 2007.
  • Scholl T et al. Vitamin E: maternal concentrations are associated with fetal growth. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 84(6):1442-8, 2006.
  • Kaiser L et al. Position of the American Dietetic Association: nutrition and lifestyle for a healthy pregnancy outcome. Journal of the American Dietetic Association. 108(3):553-61, 2008.
  • Scholl T. Maternal nutrition before and during pregnancy. Nestlé Nutrition Workshop Series Pediatrics Program. 61:79-89, 2008.
  • Pathak P et al. Prevalence of multiple micronutrient deficiencies amongst pregnant women in a rural area of Haryana. Indian Journal of Pediatrics. 71(11):1007-14, 2004. Review.
  • Castillo-Durán C et al. Zinc supplementation and growth of the fetus and low birth weight infant. Journal of Nutrition. 133(5 Suppl 1):1494S-7S, 2003. Review.
  • Wynn A and Wynn M. Magnesium and other nutrient deficiencies as possible causes of hypertension and low birth weight. N
    • Ryan-Harshman M et al. Folic acid and prevention of neural tube defects. Canadian Family Physician. 54(1):36-8, 2008.
    • Czeizel A et al. Dose-dependent effect of folic acid on the prevention of orofacial clefts. Pediatrics. 104(6):e66, 1999.
    • Ren A et al. Comparison of blood folate levels among pregnant Chinese women in areas with high and low prevalence of neural tube defects. Public Health Nutrition. 10(8):762-8, 2007.
    • Brent R et al. Further efforts to reduce the incidence of neural tube defects. Pediatrics. 119(1):225-6, 2007.
    • Lindsey L et al. Understanding optimal nutrition among women of childbearing age in the United States and Puerto Rico: employing formative research to lay the foundation for national birth defects prevention campaigns. Journal of Health Communication. 12(8):733-57, 2007.
    • Scholl T et al. Folic acid: influence on the outcome of pregnancy. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 71(5 Supplement):1295S-1303S, 2000.
    • Wald N et al. Quantifying the effect of folic acid. Lancet. 358(9298):2069-2073, 2001.
    • Locksmith G et al. Preventing neural tube defects: the importance periconceptional folic acid supplements. Obstetrics and Gynecology. 321(7):1027-1034, 1998.
    • Suarez L et al. Maternal serum B(12) levels and risk for neural tube defects in a Texas-Mexico border population. Annals of Epidemiology. 13(2):81-88, 2003.
    • Candito M et al. Nutritional and genetic determinants of vitamin B and homocysteine metabolisms in neural tube defects: a multicenter case-control study. American Journal of Medical Genetics. 146(9):1128-33, 2008.
    • Boyles A et al. Folate and one-carbon metabolism gene polymorphisms and their associations with oral facial clefts. American Journal of Medical Genetics. 146(4):440-9, 2008.
    • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Prevalence of neural tube defects and folic acid knowledge and consumption--Puerto Rico, 1996-2006. MMWR Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. 57(1):10-3, 2008.
    • Wilson R et al. Pre-conceptional vitamin/folic acid supplementation 2007: the use of folic acid in combination with a multivitamin supplement for the prevention of neural tube defects and other congenital anomalies. Journal of Obstetrics Gynecology Canada. 29(12):1003-26, 2007.
    • Gupta P et al. Multimicronutrient supplementation for undernourished pregnant women and the birth size of their offspring: a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial. Archives of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine. 161(1):58-64, 2007.
    • Scholl T et al. Vitamin E: maternal concentrations are associated with fetal growth. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 84(6):1442-8, 2006.
    • Kaiser L et al. Position of the American Dietetic Association: nutrition and lifestyle for a healthy pregnancy outcome. Journal of the American Dietetic Association. 108(3):553-61, 2008.
    • Scholl T. Maternal nutrition before and during pregnancy. Nestlé Nutrition Workshop Series Pediatrics Program. 61:79-89, 2008.
    • Pathak P et al. Prevalence of multiple micronutrient deficiencies amongst pregnant women in a rural area of Haryana. Indian Journal of Pediatrics. 71(11):1007-14, 2004. Review.
    • Castillo-Durán C et al. Zinc supplementation and growth of the fetus and low birth weight infant. Journal of Nutrition. 133(5 Suppl 1):1494S-7S, 2003. Review.
    • Wynn A and Wynn M. Magnesium and other nutrient deficiencies as possible causes of hypertension and low birth weight. Nutrition and Health. 6(2):69-88, 1988. Review.
    • Scholl T et al. Folic acid: influence on the outcome of pregnancy. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 71(5 Supplement):1295S-1303S, 2000.
    • Grant W et al. Benefits and requirements of vitamin D for optimal health: a review. Alternative Medicine Review. 10(2):94-111, 2005.
    • Zagré N et al. Prenatal multiple micronutrient supplementation has greater impact on birth weight than supplementation with iron and folic acid: a cluster-randomized, double-blind, controlled programmatic study in rural Niger. Food and Nutrition Bulletin. 28(3):317-27, 2007.
    • Hernandez-Diaz S et al. Risk of gestational hypertension in relation to folic acid supplementation during pregnancy. American Journal of Epidemiology. 156(9):806-812, 2002.
    • Wen S et al. Folic acid supplementation in early second trimester and the risk of preeclampsia. American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 198(1):45.e1-7, 2008.
    • Bodnar L et al. Maternal vitamin D deficiency increases the risk of preeclampsia. Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism. 92(9):3517-22, 2007.
    • Scholl T. Maternal nutrition before and during pregnancy. Nestlé Nutrition Workshop Series Pediatrics Program. 61:79-89, 2008.
    • Repke J. Calcium, magnesium, and zinc supplementation and perinatal outcome. Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. 34(2):262-7, 1991. Review.
    • Wynn A and Wynn M. Magnesium and other nutrient deficiencies as possible causes of hypertension and low birthweight. Nutrition and Health. 6(2):69-88, 1988. Review.
    • Altura B et al. Magnesium deficiency-induced spasms of umbilical vessels: relation to preeclampsia, hypertension, growth retardation. Science. 221(4608):376-8, 1983.
    • Hofmeyr G et al. Calcium supplementation to prevent pre-eclampsia--a systematic review. South African Medical Journal. 93(3):224-228, 2003.
    • Coetzee E et al. A randomized controlled trial of intravenous magnesium sulphate versus placebo in the management of women with severe pre-clampsia. British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 105(3):300, 1998.
    • Hypponen E. Vitamin D for the prevention of preeclampsia? A hypothesis. Nutrition Reviews. 63(7):225-232, 2005.
    • Chappell L et al. Vitamin C and E supplementation in women at risk of preeclampsia is associated with changes in indices of oxidative stress and placental function. American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 187(3):777-784, 2002.
    • Chappell L et al. Effect of antioxidants on the occurrence of pre-eclampsia in women at increased risk: a randomized trial. Lancet. 354(9181):810-816, 1999.
    • Vaidya A, et al. Effects of antenatal multiple micronutrient supplementation on children’s weight and size at 2 years of age in Nepal: follow-up of a double-blind randomized controlled trial. Lancet. 371(9611):492-9, 2008.
    • Wilcox A et al. Folic acid supplements and risk of facial clefts: national population based case-control study. British Medical Journal. 334(7591):464, 2007.
    • Shaw G et al. Risks of orofacial clefts in children born to women using multivitamins containing folic acid periconceptionally. Lancet. 346(8972):393-6, 1995.
    • Goh Y et al. Prenatal multivitamin supplementation and rates of congenital anomalies: a meta-analysis. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology Canada. 28(8):680-9, 2006. Review.
    • Lindsey L et al. Understanding optimal nutrition among women of childbearing age in the United States and Puerto Ricoutrition and Health. 6(2):69-88, 1988. Review.
    • Scholl T et al. Folic acid: influence on the outcome of pregnancy. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 71(5 Supplement):1295S-1303S, 2000.
    • Grant W et al. Benefits and requirements of vitamin D for optimal health: a review. Alternative Medicine Review. 10(2):94-111, 2005.
    • Zagré N et al. Prenatal multiple micronutrient supplementation has greater impact on birth weight than supplementation with iron and folic acid: a cluster-randomized, double-blind, controlled programmatic study in rural Niger. Food and Nutrition Bulletin. 28(3):317-27, 2007.
    • Hernandez-Diaz S et al. Risk of gestational hypertension in relation to folic acid supplementation during pregnancy. American Journal of Epidemiology. 156(9):806-812, 2002.
    • Wen S et al. Folic acid supplementation in early second trimester and the risk of preeclampsia. American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 198(1):45.e1-7, 2008.
    • Bodnar L et al. Maternal vitamin D deficiency increases the risk of preeclampsia. Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism. 92(9):3517-22, 2007.
    • Scholl T. Maternal nutrition before and during pregnancy. Nestlé Nutrition Workshop Series Pediatrics Program. 61:79-89, 2008.
    • Repke J. Calcium, magnesium, and zinc supplementation and perinatal outcome. Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology. 34(2):262-7, 1991. Review.
    • Wynn A and Wynn M. Magnesium and other nutrient deficiencies as possible causes of hypertension and low birthweight. Nutrition and Health. 6(2):69-88, 1988. Review.
    • Altura B et al. Magnesium deficiency-induced spasms of umbilical vessels: relation to preeclampsia, hypertension, growth retardation. Science. 221(4608):376-8, 1983.
    • Hofmeyr G et al. Calcium supplementation to prevent pre-eclampsia--a systematic review. South African Medical Journal. 93(3):224-228, 2003.
    • Coetzee E et al. A randomized controlled trial of intravenous magnesium sulphate versus placebo in the management of women with severe pre-clampsia. British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 105(3):300, 1998.
    • Hypponen E. Vitamin D for the prevention of preeclampsia? A hypothesis. Nutrition Reviews. 63(7):225-232, 2005.
    • Chappell L et al. Vitamin C and E supplementation in women at risk of preeclampsia is associated with changes in indices of oxidative stress and placental function. American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 187(3):777-784, 2002.
    • Chappell L et al. Effect of antioxidants on the occurrence of pre-eclampsia in women at increased risk: a randomized trial. Lancet. 354(9181):810-816, 1999.
    • Vaidya A, et al. Effects of antenatal multiple micronutrient supplementation on children’s weight and size at 2 years of age in Nepal: follow-up of a double-blind randomized controlled trial. Lancet. 371(9611):492-9, 2008.
    • Wilcox A et al. Folic acid supplements and risk of facial clefts: national population based case-control study. British Medical Journal. 334(7591):464, 2007.
    • Shaw G et al. Risks of orofacial clefts in children born to women using multivitamins containing folic acid periconceptionally. Lancet. 346(8972):393-6, 1995.
    • Goh Y et al. Prenatal multivitamin supplementation and rates of congenital anomalies: a meta-analysis. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology Canada. 28(8):680-9, 2006. Review.
    • Lindsey L et al. Understanding optimal nutrition among women of childbearing age in the United States and Puerto Rico: employing formative research to lay the foundation for national birth defects prevention campaigns. Journal of Health Communication. 12(8):733-57, 2007.
    • Goh Y et al. Prenatal supplementation with multivitamins and the incidence of pediatric cancers: clinical and methodological considerations. Pediatrics Blood and Cancer. 50(2 Suppl):487-9; discussion 498, 2008. Review.
    • Scholl T. Maternal nutrition before and during pregnancy. Nestle Nutrition Workshop Series Pediatric Program. 61:79-89, 2008.
    • Czeizel A et al. Dose-dependent effect of folic acid on the prevention of orofacial clefts. Pediatrics. 104(6):e66, 1999.
    • Scholl T et al. Folic acid: influence on the outcome of pregnancy. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 71(5 Supplement):1295S-1303S, 2000.
    • Czeizel A et al. Maternal use of nutritional supplements during the first month of pregnancy and decreased risk of Down's syndrome: case-control study. Nutrition. 21(6):698-704, 2005.
    • Thomson K et al. Postnatal evaluation of vitamin D and bone health in women who were vitamin D-deficient in pregnancy, and in their infants. The Medical Journal of Australia. 181(9):486-8, 2004.
    • Merialdi M et al. Adding zinc to prenatal iron and folate tablets improves fetal neurobehavioral development. American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 180(2 Partt 1):483-490, 1999.
    • Merialdi M et al. Randomized controlled trial of prenatal zinc supplementation and fetal bone growth. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 79(5):826-830, 2004.
    • Boyles A et al. Folate and one-carbon metabolism gene polymorphisms and their associations with oral facial clefts. American Journal of Medical Genetics. 146(4):440-9, 2008.
    • Morin P et al. Multivitamin supplement for primary prevention of birth defects: application of a preventive clinical practice. Canadian Family Physician. 53(12):2142-3, 2007.
    • Mock D et al. Marginal biotin deficiency during normal pregnancy. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 75(2):295-299, 2002.
    • Scholl T et al. Folic acid: influence on the outcome of pregnancy. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 71(5 Supplement):1295S-1303S, 2000.
    • Klenner F et al. Observations on the dose and administration of ascorbic acid when employed beyond the range of a vitamin in human pathology. Journal of Applied Nutrition. 23(3-4), 1971.
    • Grant W et al. Benefits and requirements of vitamin D for optimal health: a review. Alternative Medicine Review. 10(2):94-111, 2005.
    • Hollis B. Vitamin D requirement during pregnancy and lactation. Journal of Bone and Mineral Research. 22 Suppl 2:V39-44, 2007. Review.
    • Kaiser L et al. Position of the American Dietetic Association: nutrition and lifestyle for a healthy pregnancy outcome. Journal of the American Dietetic Association. 108(3):553-61, 2008.
    : employing formative research to lay the foundation for national birth defects prevention campaigns. Journal of Health Communication. 12(8):733-57, 2007.
  • Goh Y et al. Prenatal supplementation with multivitamins and the incidence of pediatric cancers: clinical and methodological considerations. Pediatrics Blood and Cancer. 50(2 Suppl):487-9; discussion 498, 2008. Review.
  • Scholl T. Maternal nutrition before and during pregnancy. Nestle Nutrition Workshop Series Pediatric Program. 61:79-89, 2008.
  • Czeizel A et al. Dose-dependent effect of folic acid on the prevention of orofacial clefts. Pediatrics. 104(6):e66, 1999.
  • Scholl T et al. Folic acid: influence on the outcome of pregnancy. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 71(5 Supplement):1295S-1303S, 2000.
  • Czeizel A et al. Maternal use of nutritional supplements during the first month of pregnancy and decreased risk of Down's syndrome: case-control study. Nutrition. 21(6):698-704, 2005.
  • Thomson K et al. Postnatal evaluation of vitamin D and bone health in women who were vitamin D-deficient in pregnancy, and in their infants. The Medical Journal of Australia. 181(9):486-8, 2004.
  • Merialdi M et al. Adding zinc to prenatal iron and folate tablets improves fetal neurobehavioral development. American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 180(2 Partt 1):483-490, 1999.
  • Merialdi M et al. Randomized controlled trial of prenatal zinc supplementation and fetal bone growth. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 79(5):826-830, 2004.
  • Boyles A et al. Folate and one-carbon metabolism gene polymorphisms and their associations with oral facial clefts. American Journal of Medical Genetics. 146(4):440-9, 2008.
  • Morin P et al. Multivitamin supplement for primary prevention of birth defects: application of a preventive clinical practice. Canadian Family Physician. 53(12):2142-3, 2007.
  • Mock D et al. Marginal biotin deficiency during normal pregnancy. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 75(2):295-299, 2002.
  • Scholl T et al. Folic acid: influence on the outcome of pregnancy. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 71(5 Supplement):1295S-1303S, 2000.
  • Klenner F et al. Observations on the dose and administration of ascorbic acid when employed beyond the range of a vitamin in human pathology. Journal of Applied Nutrition. 23(3-4), 1971.
  • Grant W et al. Benefits and requirements of vitamin D for optimal health: a review. Alternative Medicine Review. 10(2):94-111, 2005.
  • Hollis B. Vitamin D requirement during pregnancy and lactation. Journal of Bone and Mineral Research. 22 Suppl 2:V39-44, 2007. Review.
  • Kaiser L et al. Position of the American Dietetic Association: nutrition and lifestyle for a healthy pregnancy outcome. Journal of the American Dietetic Association. 108(3):553-61, 2008.
*These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product(s) is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

REVIEW SNAPSHOT®

by PowerReviews
Isotonix® Prenatal Activated Multivitamin
 
4.5

(based on 64 reviews)

Ratings Distribution

  • 5 Stars

     

    (45)

  • 4 Stars

     

    (14)

  • 3 Stars

     

    (1)

  • 2 Stars

     

    (2)

  • 1 Stars

     

    (2)

92%

of respondents would recommend this to a friend.

Pros

  • Simple to take (37)
  • Easy on stomach (23)
  • Effective (23)
  • Good taste (20)
  • Easy to swallow (19)

Cons

  • Difficult to swallow (3)

Best Uses

  • Women (45)
  • Daily use (32)
    • Reviewer Profile:
    • First time user (30), Health conscious (19), Medical professional (5), Regular user (4)

Reviewed by 64 customers

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Displaying reviews 1-5

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(1 of 2 customers found this review helpful)

 
5.0

Great Great Product..

By LuchyR

from USA

Comments about Isotonix® Prenatal Activated Multivitamin:

I will strongly recommend this product. Within a week of taking it my hunger diminished, my acid reflux almost disappeared. Constipation was gone, my energy levels went up 100 percent and my morning sickness was gone shortly after taking it. You can go wrong with this vitamins I love themmmmmm ..

(1 of 2 customers found this review helpful)

 
5.0

Wonderful Product

By KeelyB

from USA

Comments about Isotonix® Prenatal Activated Multivitamin:

I love Market America Isotonix products because they are not only so much easier for my body to absorb, but they taste great too! I had terrible morning sickness for the first 18 weeks of pregnancy and could hardly keep anything down, let alone take prenatal vitamins that would make me nearly throw up because my gag reflex was so strong for a while. I didn't know there was a prenatal in the isotonix, but I am so glad I discovered it. I feel assured in the fact that my body is absorbing all the nutrients in the vitamin and so is my baby. It tastes great and I have felt more energized since I added it to my OPC-3 every morning! Great Product.

(1 of 2 customers found this review helpful)

 
4.0

great overall

By BriannaT

from USA

Comments about Isotonix® Prenatal Activated Multivitamin:

at first, i thought it tasted disgusting. i don't know what it was but i could not breathe through my nose when drinking it! now i've been taking it for several months and somehow it doesn't taste that bad anymore. to me it's not as delicious as the regular isotonix multivitamin, but i can stand it now. and i definitely think the prenatal ingredients are great - as other people have said, if i ever miss a day of taking it i feel totally different, like tired and almost kind of sick too. so i never forget anymore! i would recommend this to anyone as a go-to prenatal multivitamin.

(1 of 2 customers found this review helpful)

 
5.0

Nutrients get to Baby...

By BonnieC

from USA

SHOP CONSULTANT

Comments about Isotonix® Prenatal Activated Multivitamin:

This is totally absorbed, quickly. No stomach upset from horse pills. Nice to know it goes where it was intended. To the baby.

(1 of 1 customers found this review helpful)

 
5.0

I love this!

By Monique

from Malden, MA

Verified Buyer

Comments about Isotonix® Prenatal Activated Multivitamin:

The Isotonix Prenatal Multivitamin has made me feel so much better. I use to take the One A Day Prenatal Vitamins, and in comparison, the Isotonix Prenatal gives me more energy, I dont feel as hungry, I feel as though I don't have pregnancy brain as often as I did with the O.A.D.P.Vitamins. Also, no more taking those huge pills, I just drink it and go. (It taste like pineapple juice and tang to me)

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