Isotonix® Antioxidant Formula

isotonix antioxidant

What Makes Isotonix® Antioxidant Unique?

A free radical is an atomic structure with an unpaired electron in its outermost shell. These unpaired electrons tend to be highly reactive, resulting in chemical reactions such as oxidation. Because they have one or more unpaired electrons, free radicals are highly unstable. They scavenge the body to grab or donate electrons, causing damage to cells, proteins and DNA. Free radicals are naturally occurring; however, air pollution, stress, smoking, heavy exercising and aging all contribute to the creation of harmful free radicals. Normally the body is able to protect itself from the damaging effects of free radicals, but if antioxidants are unavailable, or if free radical production becomes excessive, damage can occur.

Antioxidants are natural cell protectors, neutralizing free radicals by pairing an electron to the outermost shell of radical oxygen molecules, rendering them harmless. Antioxidants are nutrients such as vitamins and minerals, and enzymes that are capable of counteracting the damaging, but normal, effects of the physiological process of oxidation in bodily tissues. Antioxidants work in two ways, chain breaking and prevention. A chain-breaking antioxidant such as vitamins A, C and E, stabilize free radicals or cause them to decay into harmless atomic structures. A preventative antioxidant prevents the oxidation process by scavenging free radicals.*

Isotonix Antioxidant contains a powerful combination of beta-carotene, vitamins C and E, and the minerals selenium and potassium. These vitamins and minerals were selected for their strong antioxidant properties. Isotonix Antioxidant helps to eliminate free radicals, promotes skin health, supports healthy immune function and vision and helps to promote optimal cardiovascular health.

Isotonic, which means "same pressure," bears the same chemical resemblance of the body's blood, plasma and tears. All fluids in the body have a certain concentration, referred to as osmotic pressure. The body's common osmotic pressure, which is isotonic, allows a consistent maintenance of body tissues. In order for a substance to be absorbed and used in the body's metabolism, it must be transported in an isotonic state.

Isotonix® dietary supplements are delivered in an isotonic solution. This means that the body has less work to do to obtain maximum absorption. The isotonic state of the suspension allows nutrients to pass directly into the small intestine and be rapidly absorbed into the bloodstream. With Isotonix products, little nutritive value is lost, making the absorption of nutrients highly efficient while delivering maximum results.*

Primary Benefits of Isotonix® Antioxidant Formula*

  • Helps to rid the body of free radicals
  • Helps prevent the negative effects of free radicals on cell structures
  • Aids in reducing lipid peroxidation
  • Helps to prevent the build-up of oxygen free radicals and nitric oxide
  • Promotes skin health
  • Supports healthy immune function
  • Promotes healthy vision
  • May help promote cardiovascular health

Key Ingredients Found In Isotonix® Antioxidant

Beta-Carotene (Vitamin A Precurser) 10,000 IU
Vitamin A is a fat-soluble vitamin that is needed by all body tissues for growth and repair. It is part of a group of compounds that include retinol, retinal and beta-carotene. Beta-carotene, also known as pro-vitamin A, is transformed by the body into vitamin A. It is an anti-aging vitamin that also aids in skin health (both topically and as an oral supplement), promotes vision, reproduction and brain development, prevents infection and is important for bone formation. Vitamin A can be found in foods like organ meats (liver and kidney), egg yolks, butter, milk and cod liver oil.

Vitamin C 300 mg
Vitamin C, also known as ascorbic acid, is an essential nutrient for humans, and is needed for metabolic reactions in the body. Foods such as oranges, lemons, grapefruit, strawberries, tomatoes, brussels sprouts, peppers and cantaloupes, are good sources of vitamin C.

Vitamin C is known for its function as one of the key nutritional antioxidants that protect the body from free radical damage. It strengthens cells, and is an essential cofactor for the enzymes involved in the synthesis of collagen. Vitamin C is more commonly known for its roles as a preventative against infections and other viruses, wound healing, protection against the effects of stress, and promoting iron absorption. The antioxidant function of vitamin C is performed within the aqueous compartments of the blood and inside cells.

Studies have shown that vitamin C protects plasma lipids from oxidative damage and also protects DNA and protein from various oxidative processes.

Vitamin E 60 IU
Since vitamin E is one of the most powerful fat-soluble antioxidants in the body. It helps protect cell membranes from the damage caused by free radicals. High doses of vitamin E have been found to reduce the risk of heart attacks, by decreasing blood clotting, which may be advantageous to those with heart disease. Vegetable oils, margarine, nuts, seeds, avocados, wheat germ and safflower oil are all good source of vitamin E. Vitamin E is linked improving heart health, enhancement of immune system function and topical wound healing.

Potassium 99 mg
Potassium, in the body, is classified as an electrolyte and is involved in electrical and cellular functions in the body. It aids in regulating water balance, levels of acidity, maintenance of blood pressure, transmission of nerve impulses, digestion, muscle contraction and heart beat. Evidence suggests that diets high in potassium may protect against hypertension and promote cardiovascular health. Some potassium enriched foods are fruits, vegetables, and legumes, which are all commonly recommended for optimal heart health.

Riboflavin (Vitamin B2): 3 mg
Riboflavin is found in liver, dairy products, dark green vegetables and some types of seafood. It serves as a coenzyme, working with other B vitamins to support the nervous system and normal human growth. It also supports healthy skin, nails, hair growth and helps maintain a healthy thyroid. Riboflavin plays a crucial role in turning food into energy as a part of the electron transport chain, driving cellular energy on the micro-level. It aids in the breakdown of fats while functioning as a cofactor or "helper" in activating vitamin B6 and folic acid. Riboflavin is water-soluble and cannot be stored by the body except in insignificant amounts; thus, it must be replenished daily. As a cofactor for glutathione reductase, riboflavin can play a role in protecting our body from potentially harmful free-radicals. Riboflavin coenzymes are also important for the transformation of vitamin B6 and folic acid into their active forms and for the conversion of tryptophan into niacin.

Selenium 100 mcg
Selenium functions as an antioxidant enzyme and is necessary for normal growth and use of iodine in thyroid function. It is essential for a healthy immune system. Selenium supports the antioxidant effect of vitamin E, aids in cardiovascular health, helps protect the skin, supports male fertility and a healthy immune system. Selenium plays a direct role in the body's ability to protect cells from free radical damage. It is also involved in the defense against the toxicity of reactive oxygen species, regulation of the thyroid hormone metabolism and the regulation of the redox state of cells. Selenium also has the ability to detoxify some metals and xenobiotics.

The selenium content of the soil in which plants are grown determines the amount of selenium contained in the food. Good dietary sources of selenium include nuts, unrefined grains, brown rice, wheat germ and seafood.

Frequently Asked Questions About Isotonix® Antioxidant

What are antioxidants?
Antioxidants are natural cell protectors, neutralizing free radicals by pairing an electron to the outermost shell of radical oxygen molecules, rendering them harmless. Antioxidants are nutrients such as vitamins and minerals, and enzymes that are capable of counteracting the damaging, but normal, effects of the physiological process of oxidation in bodily tissues. Antioxidants work in two ways, chain breaking and prevention. A chain-breaking antioxidant such as vitamins A, C and E, stabilize free radicals or cause them to decay into harmless atomic structures. A preventative antioxidant prevents the oxidation process by scavenging free radicals.*

What are free radicals?
A free radical is an atomic structure with an unpaired electron in its outermost shell. These unpaired electrons tend to be highly reactive, resulting in chemical reactions such as oxidation. Because they have one or more unpaired electrons, free radicals are highly unstable. They scavenge the body to grab or donate electrons, causing damage to cells, proteins and DNA. Free radicals are naturally occurring; however, air pollution, stress, smoking, heavy exercising and aging all contribute to the creation of harmful free radicals. Normally the body is able to protect itself from the damaging effects of free radicals, but if antioxidants are unavailable, or if free radical production becomes excessive, damage can occur.

What is the best antioxidant to take?
There is no single best antioxidant to take because different antioxidants often act in concert with one another. The most effective way to fight free radicals is with a combination of antioxidants.

What type of vitamin E is in the Antioxidant formula?
The vitamin E in the Antioxidant formula is the natural, high activity d, l-alpha-tocopherol. It has been converted to the all-synthetic, acetate form, to aid in water solubility.

Scientific Studies Which Support Isotonix® Antioxidant

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*These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product(s) is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

Helping to promote skin health, cardiovascular health and healthy vision, Isotonix® Antioxidant contains an effective blend of powerful vitamins and minerals designed to combat free radicals and provide optimal health.

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