Pigmentum Malbec 2005 (Wine)

Pigmentum Malbec 2005 (Wine)

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Product Information

Product Information

Pigmentum Malbec 2005 (Wine)

Wine Messenger Rating: 91+
Country: France
Region: Cahors
Grape: Malbec
Alcohol: 12.5%
Description: A full-bodied, easy-drinking Malbec from Cahors: the birthplace of Malbec.
Release Notes: Georges Vigouroux, a noted Cahors producer, makes this wine from Malbec grapes grown near the river Lot. Although this wine qualifies as a Cahors, he decided to declassify it so that the more accessible Malbec name could feature prominently on the label. It was vinified traditionally, with a long fermentation, to aid in tannin extraction.
Tasting Notes: Very dark garnet color. Pleasant aromas of red and black fruits (raspberry and blackcurrant). Extremely full-bodied with ripe tannins and great fruit concentration. This easy-drinking Malbec is great with red meats, grilled chicken, or goat cheese; drink now to 2010.
Pair with: Goat Cheese, Grilled Red Meats, Red Meats
Winery: Of old stock from the Lot region of France, the Vigouroux family has been in the wine business for a century and a half owes its renown to know-how handed down from generation to generation. It was Georges Vigouroux, the third generation, who first planted vines on the hillsides of Cahors in 1971. He chose the spot where there had been a vineyard in the Middle Ages, becaming one of the new generation of pioneers of Cahors


Now under the direction of his son, Bertrand-Gabriel Vigouroux, an oenologist, the production has expanded. Now the Vigouroux family own many of Cahors best estates, which they vinify in their beautiful stone-walled cellar called Atrium.

Region Info: In the rugged limestone soils of Southwest France, Malbec is still widely planted. Its most famous wines come from Cahors, a medieval town on the river Lot. The “black wines of Cahors” have long been famous; there is even evidence that they were exported to London in the early 13th century!