TLS Detox Kit

(1)
TLS Detox Kit
  • Contains (1) TLS® CORE; (1) Isotonix® Multivitamin without Iron (30 servings); (1) NutriClean® 7-Day Cleansing System and (1) Isotonix OPC-3® (30 servings)
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  • Includes TLS CORE; Isotonix Multivitamin without Iron (30 Servings); NutriClean 7-Day Cleansing System and Isotonix OPC-3 (30 Servings)
Contains (1) TLS® CORE; (1) Isotonix® Multivitamin without Iron (30 servings); (1) NutriClean® 7-Day Cleansing System and (1) Isotonix OPC-3® (30 servings)
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Includes TLS CORE; Isotonix Multivitamin without Iron (30 Servings); NutriClean 7-Day Cleansing System and Isotonix OPC-3 (30 Servings)

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Includes TLS CORE; Isotonix Multivitamin without Iron (30 Servings); NutriClean 7-Day Cleansing System and Isotonix OPC-3 (30 Servings)

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Product Information

  • Includes four (4) products - TLS® CORE, Isotonix® Multivitamin 30 Day, NutriClean® 7-Day Cleansing System and Isotonix OPC-3® 30 Day
  • Save 28% on these products by purchasing the kit
  • Helps to cleanse and detoxify the liver*
  • Supports leptin sensitivity, which may help to manage hunger and cravings and stimulate lipolysis (fat burning)*
  • Helps inhibit carbohydrate absorption in the body*
  • Supports healthy nutrient absorption*
  • Helps promote digestive health*
  • Supports a healthy immune system*
  • Contains potent antioxidants that combat free radicals and toxins in the body*
  • Helps maintain healthy metabolic functioning*


 

Instead of turning to individual detox supplements that don't give you everything you need, use the TLS Detox Kit - combining four of our most popular supplements that support your health, wellness and weight loss at a tremendous savings.

More than just a detox cleanse, the TLS Detox Kit provides a complete nutritional regimen for those who decide to undertake a weight loss detox.

The NutriClean 7-Day Detoxification System - a colon and liver cleanse detox supplement - uses nutrients, herbs and botanicals to mildly purge, detoxify and cleanse the digestive system. To help round out your nutritional needs while following your detoxification plan, the TLS Detox Kit includes Isotonix Multivitamin, delivering 100% or more of the daily value of essential vitamins and minerals you might not receive during your detox.

We've also included our all-star antioxidant, Isotonix OPC-3. Studies have shown OPCs to be more effective than vitamins C and E in neutralizing harmful free radicals and oxidants built up in the body. Thanks to the power of Pycnogenol, Isotonix OPC-3 helps fight oxidation and free radicals in the body.

Finally, for further support while detoxing, TLS CORE helps inhibit the amount of starchy carbohydrates being absorbed by the body while promoting the feeling of fullness. This will help you manage hunger that could interfere with the detox cleanse.

Coupled with our other TLS weight loss supplements, the TLS Detox Kit can help support your detox and weight loss goals.

*These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product(s) is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

Ingredients

HepatoCleanse 1260 mg  Proprietary Blend
The first step in the NutriClean system features HepatoCleanse™ capsules, a combination of special botanicals and nutrients that can help support healthy liver function.* The liver is the body's primary filter for toxins. The filtering process is achieved through a coordinated effort of two families of enzymes known as cytochrome P450s and conjugation enzymes. These enzymes can underperform due to a poor diet, excessive alcohol consumption and chronic stress. The cytochrome P450 enzymes split molecular oxygen (O2) and create activated oxygen radical to react with a foreign compound. The conjugation enzyme can then act upon the oxidized compound, and add other types of molecules to make the foreign compound more water soluble and excretable to help flush excess waste out of the body. 

Milk Thistle Seed (extract standardized to 80 % silymarin)
Milk thistle promotes liver and gallbladder health by providing free radical scavenging activity and support of normal liver cell regeneration. Milk thistle has been observed to demonstrate strong, supportive activity when liver cells are challenged by a variety of toxins. Milk thistle supports the normal regeneration of liver tissue, healthy liver and bile cholesterol. Milk thistle contains a compound called silymarin, a potent antioxidant that scavenges harmful free radicals. Additionally, it has been found to promote kidney health and may also support the prostate gland. Silymarin, as well as an isolated form of flavonolignan called silybin, can support a healthy liver and promote the body’s natural ability to combat toxins, such as alcohol, environmental and bacterial toxins, and poisons. There have been many studies that indicate silymarin’s effectiveness in cleansing the liver. 

N-Acetyl-L-cysteine
N-Acetyl Cysteine (NAC) is derived from the sulfur-containing amino acid, cysteine. It is produced naturally in the body and is also found in foods. Along with glutamic acid and glycine, NAC supports the conversion of cysteine into glutathione. Glutiathione is one of the body’s primary cellular antioxidants. NAC has indicated that it enhances the immune system, detoxifies certain substances, supports a healthy heart and reduces exercise fatigue. It is thought that NAC’s suggested benefits come from either of its two primary actions in the body. First, NAC is quickly metabolized to intracellular glutathione. Glutathione (GTH) and the enzyme complexes that it forms acts as free radical reducing agents and antioxidants in the body. GTH also detoxifies chemicals into less harmful compounds. GTH is also known to support the normal transport of nutrients to lymphocytes and phagocytes, two major types of immune cells, and to promote the health of cell membranes. NAC is thought to be the best source method of boosting cellular GTH levels. Further, NAC has also been shown to support healthy platelet aggregation and supports healthy lipoprotein levels. 

Dandelion Root   
The dandelion, the common stubborn plant of many a front lawn, is an unusually nutritious food. Its leaves contain substantial amounts of vitamin A as well as moderate amounts of vitamin D, vitamin C, various B vitamins, iron, silicon, magnesium, zinc and manganese. Dandelion takes its name from the French dent de lion, or lion's tooth - a reference to the toothed edges of its leaves. Dandelion root has been shown to support a healthy liver, kidney, gallbladder and joints. 

Dandelion root is regarded as a "liver tonic," a substance believed to support the liver in an unspecified way. The bitter properties of dandelion help to support healthy bile production in the gallbladder and bile flow from the liver. These compounds are unique to the dandelion plant and were previously referred to as taraxacin. The bitters from dandelion are recommended to support healthy liver function. The support of normal bile flow may also help support healthy fat (including cholesterol) metabolism in the body. Dandelion root is also used like other bitter herbs to help support a healthy appetite and support a healthy digestive system.

Garlic Bulb
Garlic was used in China as early as A.D. 510. Louis Pasteur studied the antibacterial action of garlic in 1858. These days, it is largely used because it supports the cardiovascular system. Garlic experts agree that the herb does help maintain normal cholesterol levels. It may also help maintain normal triglyceride levels. Garlic also has some antioxidant properties. 

Hawthorn Berry Extract
Hawthorn, or Crataegus oxyacantha, grows as a thorny shrub with white or pink flowers and berries that resemble miniature apples. This shrub is native to northern temperate climates in Asia, Europe and eastern North America. Hawthorn has been used in China for centuries for digestion. As early as the Renaissance, Europeans have used this supplement for digestive health; beginning in the late 1800s, doctors in Europe began to use hawthorn to promote a healthy heart. The main benefit of Hawthorn seems to be in heart health. Hawthorn contains a group of chemicals known as flavonoids, the main group of components in this plant, thought to work together to support the heart in several ways. First, hawthorn extract can support healthy vessels of the heart by promoting normal blood flow. Second, hawthorn helps maintain normal blood pressure.  Lastly, as an antioxidant, hawthorn helps to maintain healthy collagen matrices of arterial walls so that the vessels maintain elasticity. Hawthorn berry extract also helps the release of water tension and excess sodium in the body.

Schizandra Chinensis Fruit and Seed Extract
Schizandra, has an extensive history in ancient Chinese medicine as an herb promoting general well-being and vitality. Schizandra originates from the red berries that grow on a vine-like plant belonging to the magnolia family. Approximately 25 species of schizandra exist, and all are indigenous to Asia except for a rare form of the vine that grows in wooded areas in North Carolina and surrounding states. In addition to its traditional uses for increasing energy and helping decrease stress-induced fatigue, schizandra has traditionally been taken to support the sex organs, to promote mental function and to beautify the skin. It promotes liver and kidney health, enhances aerobic capacity and energy levels, promotes normal vision, and supports mental functioning. 

Schizandra is part of the adaptogen family made up of compounds believed to promote balance in the body. Schizandra contain lignans, which are a concentrated component of the seeds of the schisandra berry that may support the immune system, promote liver health, and promote the body’s ability to cope with stress.

Yellow Dock Root
Yellow dock is related to the buckwheat family that is native to northern Europe and Asia, but its ability to adjust to various climates has allowed it to spread to many parts of the world. It is also known as curly dock, because of the shape of its leaves, or sour dock, due to its bitter taste. In ancient times, the Chinese and Romans used yellow dock as a digestive aid and for skin health. Today, it can be found in many forms, and still functions to promote skin and liver health, and as a mild laxative. Yellow dock helps support a healthy digestive system. It supports the appetite, and promotes normal bile flow and digestion. Like other popular herbal laxatives, yellow dock contains anthraquinone glycosides, contributing to the herb’s frequent usage as a laxative to support healthy bowel movements. The tannins in yellow dock also give it a digestive bitter quality that could support appetite and bile flow, which promote normal digestion. 

Burdock Root
Burdock is a well-respected, health-promoting herb. It was used to support healthy joints and a healthy digestive system. Burdock root also contains high amounts of inulin and mucilage. This may explain its soothing effects on the gastrointestinal tract. Also, burdock has been shown to support a healthy liver. Burdock is widely used to moisturize the skin.     

Licorice Root
Licorice root has long been used in both foods and health products. In Chinese medicine, licorice is an ingredient in nearly all herbal formulas. Among its most prominent uses are as a demulcent (soothing, coating agent) in the digestive and urinary tracts.

Barberry Bark and Root
Barberry has been used extensively throughout the world for its health properties.  Berberine is isolated from the roots and bark of Berberis vulgaris. Berberine is a plant alkaloid with a long history of health-promoting use in both Ayurvedic and Chinese medicine. Berberine is a key constituent of the immune enhancing herb, goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis). Berberine helps to support a healthy immune system. This compound also supports healthy bowel movements. Berbamine is another alkaloid found in barberry. It is an antioxidant. The bitter compounds present in barberry, including the alkaloids mentioned above, support normal digestion. Additionally, barberry has shown to support healthy liver and gallbladder functions.

Rosemary Leaf
Herbalists have long used rosemary as an energy booster for the elderly and to help with normal digestion. In China, it is used to promote head comfort. Rosemary has been used to support a healthy appetite, liver and gallbladder, and maintain normal blood pressure. Some less-than-conclusive evidence hints that rosemary, or its constituents, may have antioxidant effects. 

Ginger Root
Ginger is a shoot-like plant with a single purple-green flower that contains a thick root from which uses for this plant originate. It is native to coastal India, but it now grows and is harvested in Jamaica, China, Africa and the West Indies. Ginger has been used for years to support healthy gastrointestinal health and to support healthy bowel movements. Ginger also supports a healthy cardiovascular system.

Green Tea Leaf Extract
Green tea has been used for its health properties for centuries in India and China. A number of beneficial health effects are related to regular consumption of green tea, and dried/powdered extracts are available as a part of dietary supplements. Green tea is prepared by picking, lightly steaming and allowing the leaves to dry. The active components in green tea are a family of polyphenols (catechins) and flavonols which possess potent antioxidant activity that combat free radicals and flush toxins from the body. Tannins, large polyphenol molecules, form the bulk of the active compounds in green tea, with catechins comprising nearly 90 percent. Several catechins are present in major quantities: epicatechin (EC), epigallocatechin (EGC), epicatechin gallate (ECG), and epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG). EGCG makes up around 10-50 percent of the total catechin content, and appears to be the most powerful of all the catechins with antioxidant activity about 25-100 times more powerful than vitamins C and E. Green tea extract is reported to have positive effects, including cardiovascular system support via helping to maintain normal cholesterol levels and triglycerides levels. It is a potent immune enhancer and has been found to be a potent energy promoter. Recent studies have suggested that catechins may be important in promoting weight loss. In some studies, green tea is associated with promoting thermogenesis (caloric expenditure) – which is generally attributed to its caffeine content. At least one study has shown that green tea extract stimulates thermogenesis to an extent that is much greater than can be attributed to its caffeine content per se – meaning that the thermogenic properties of green tea may be due to an interaction between its high content of catechin-polyphenols, along with caffeine. A probable theory for the thermogenic effect of green tea is an increase in levels of norepinephrine because catechin-polyphenols are known to inhibit catechol-O-methyl-transferase (the enzyme that degrades norepinephrine).

Hyssop (aerial parts)
The herb hyssop also known as Hyssop officinalis has been used for ages in both religion and health care. A two-foot high, evergreen shrub with dark blue flowers, hyssop grows naturally throughout the Mediterranean region but is also cultivated elsewhere. Hyssop has been used to promote digestive health. 

Red Clover Flower
Red clover is a member of the legume (bean) family — the same class of plants as chickpeas and soybeans. Red clover was and is considered one of the premier purifying herbs for the blood. Red clover extracts are used as dietary supplements for their high content of isoflavone compounds. These compounds have proven to be of some benefit for women going through menopause. A double-blind trial found that red clover supported a healthy cardiovascular system in menopausal women.It is claimed that red clover can balance moods, support healthy sleeping patterns, reduce hot flashes, support a normal libido, support heart health and promote the maintenance of bone mass, as well.

Turmeric Root Extract
Turmeric is part of the ginger family. Its stalk is used in both food and medicine, creating the common yellow ingredient that colors and adds flavor to curry. In traditional Indian Ayurveda, turmeric is thought to support general body strength, vision and normal milk secretion. Within dietary supplements, turmeric is found both alone, and in combination with products created to exert antioxidant activity and provide gastrointestinal support. The primary active compounds in turmeric are the flavonoid, curcumin and related “curcuminoid” compounds which deliver potent antioxidant properties. 

Release (1160 mg)  Proprietary Blend
Nutriclean’s Release tablets are a combination of herbs and botanicals that provide a safe, easy, and effective means of maintaining a healthy digestive tract via promoting bowel regularity. They produce a laxative effect on the gastrointestinal system by promoting perstalsis, which are the natural contractions and movements initiated by the body’s digestive system. Release tablets work to cleanse the bowel gently, supporting the gastrointestinal tract’s ability to both absorb necessary vitamins and minerals, and eliminate toxins.* 

Rhubarb Root  
Rhubarb helps address occasional constipation and supports healthy bowel movements. Rhubarb can also be utilized in cleansing the intestines as a part of the NutriClean detoxification system. Rhubarb contains compounds called anthraquinones, laxative substances similar to those found in senna or cascara. It has a mild laxative effect as it promotes secretion of fluid into the bowel, causing strong muscular contractions of the bowel wall and speeding up bowel movements. Research suggests that rhubarb may support both the kidney and liver. 

Buckthorn Bark
Buckthorn is a tall shrub native to northern Europe. It is primarily used for supporting healthy bowel movements. Buckthorn has been used as a beneficial laxative in northern and central Europe, including England, for many years. Buckthorn bark and berries are high in anthraquinone glycosides. Anthraquinone glycosides, as found in rhubarb, have a cathartic action, promoting the large intestine’s muscular contraction or peristalsis, and then supporting water movement from the cells of the colon into the feces, resulting in soft bowel movement.It takes six to 10 hours for buckthorn to act after taking it by mouth. 

Cascara Sagrada bark extract (20 percent hydroxyanthracene derivatives calculated as cascaroside A)
Cascara is quite powerful in supporting normal bowel movements. Indigenous to the Pacific Northwest, Cascara probably got the name sacred bark due to its ability to promote normal bowel movements. The bark is dried for one year before it is used in order to allow the potency to dampen a bit before human ingestion. Cascara promotes passage and a softer stool. This herb works to support normal bowel movements.

Gentian Root
Gentian promotes a normal appetite. It is a perennial plant that grows to about four feet and produces yellow flowers. Its name derives from Gentius, King of Illyria (180-167 BC), who discovered the plant's health properties. It works by stimulating the taste buds, thus promoting saliva and digestive juices, which is attributed to gentian’s bitter properties.

Anise Seed
Originally deriving from the Near East, the anise plant can now be found in southern Europe, Turkey, central Asia, India, China, Japan, and Central and South America. The ripe fruit and dried seeds provide the plant's healthful oil. Anise is used to support a normal appetite and gallbladder health. 

Fennel Seed
Fennel first grew in the Mediterranean region and then spread to England, Germany and Argentina. Today, it also grows in Iran, Iraq and China. Fennel seed is used to promote normal digestion.  

Black Walnut Bark
Black walnut promotes liver and gallbladder health. In homeopathic medicine, it's used to help promote head comfort and skin health. The main chemical compound, Juglone, serves as a gentle laxative.      

Oregon Grape Root
Oregon grape root is a close relative to Barberry. It’s used to promote gall bladder health. In addition, it has been used as a bitter tonic to support a healthy appetite and digestive function. Isolated berberine has been shown to effectively support healthy bowel movements. Berberine promotes the health of the urinary tract. 

Scutellaria Root extract
Scutellaria root may have beneficial antioxidant and sleep aid value. According to ancient Chinese medicine, scutellaria is used for supporting healthy blood pressure. Three bioactive flavonoids - baicalin, baicalein and wogonin - have been extracted from scutellaria and are thought to contribute to the major activities of the plant. All three flavonoids have exhibited potential support of the immune system due to its antibacterial and antifungal properties. Scutellaria also helps reduce cholesterol and purge harmful fatty acids from the liver.  

Goldenseal (aerial parts)
Goldenseal is an herb with a wide variety of indications. It has been reported to promote normal digestion and urinary tract health.    

Peppermint Leaf
The oil from the peppermint leaf can promote normal appetite, liver and gallbladder health, normal digestion and healthy bowel movements. Germany's Commission E indicates the use of oral peppermint oil for promoting normal digestion. Some preliminary evidence has shown that peppermint oil may in fact be effective for this purpose. The active ingredient of peppermint oil for this purpose is thought to be menthol. It relaxes the muscles of the small intestine. Peppermint has shown benefits for maintaining general gastrointestinal comfort.  

NutriClean Advanced Fiber Powder
NutriCleanAdvanced Fiber Powder mixes easily with water and is composed of fibers, probiotics and gastrointestinal nutrients shown to help relieve occasional constipation. It comes in a delicious mixed berry flavor and mixes easily with water. NutriClean Fiber Powder relieves occasional constipation, thereby balancing the activity of the bowel. The bowel is the point of excretion from the digestive system and a major determinant in overall digestive system health. This blend of fibers and probiotics team up to deliver optimum cleansing by purifying the colon as it balances the bowel, and promotes a healthy immune system. NutriClean Advanced Fiber Powder delivers top quality soluble fiber, with beneficial probiotics, which promotes the growth of good bacteria in the colon, keeping things in balance in terms of microorganisms. Verified by our in-house scientists, NutriClean Advanced Fiber powder contains one of the most advantageous mixtures of L-glutamine, inulin, Fibersol-2 and probiotics. Advanced Fiber Powder’s probiotic blend supplies 1.5 billion healthful microorganisms.

Fibersol-2® (soluble fiber flucose polymer complex) 
Fibersol-2 is a soluble fiber which supports the elimination of wastes and colon cleansing, as well as helping to maintain balanced bowels, normal bowel regularity and fecal volume, and supporting healthy digestive function. Fibersol-2  is a safe (GRAS) maltodextrin, easily mixed in water and carries no flavor. Fibersol-2 has a very low viscosity, high solubility, low hygroscopicity and clarity in solution. Because it is high in naturally-occurring chemical bonds that remain undigested even in the digestive tract, it helps to support overall health by helping to maintain normal cholesterol levels, helping to maintain normal blood glucose levels and promoting immune health.

A general review article by Kazuhiro Ohkuma and Shigeru Wakabayashi (Advanced Dietary Fibre Technology, 2000) covered the beneficial properties of Fibersol-2. "Its viscosity is lower than that of a conventional maltodextrin, although both have the same DE value," they noted. "A solution of Fibersol-2 is very clear and stable and does not become cloudy or show signs of any precipitation when kept for long periods of time. It also has very good anti-acid properties, and can be cooked and sterilized at high temperature in food applications due to its stability in heat processes." Many studies on Fibersol-2 have looked at its health benefits. Physiologically, the ingredient has been shown to promote normal bowel regularity and stool volume.

Fibersol-2 is capable of increasing the amount of good bacteria, probiotics, within the large intestine due to the fact that most of this fiber is transported to that specific area of the colon. In a normal absorption pattern of a sugar and starch mixture, the majority is absorbed in the stomach and in the beginning of the small intestine. Ohkuma and Wakabayashi hypothesized that most of Fibersol-2 escapes digestion in the upper gastrointestinal tract. "It is estimated that approximately 90 percent of the administered Fibersol-2 reaches the large intestine and half of that is metabolized by intestinal bacteria," they noted.

Fibersol-2’s slow digestion helps maintain blood glucose levels. In one study, changes in postprandial blood glucose levels were monitored in 40 healthy humans. The subjects were given a fixed menu of Japanese udon noodles with fried bean curd and rice, with either green tea or a beverage containing 5.0 g of Fibersol-2. Postprandial blood glucose levels for subjects receiving green tea and Fibersol-2 remained low, compared to subjects ingesting only green tea, despite the subjects eating the same food. (Tokunaga K and Matsuoka A, "Effects of a [FOSHU] which contains indigestible dextrin as an effective ingredient on glucose and lipid metabolism," J Japanese Diabetes Society, 42:61-65, 1999.) Animal models have taken this finding further to determine how it could promote weight loss. 

Inulin Fiber (fructo-oligosaccharide extract of chicory root) 
Inulin fiber delivers prebiotics to the digestive tract, providing the intestines these necessary types of prebiotic fibers are food sources that are preferred by friendly bacteria. Inulin, an important prebiotic, exists in foods such as asparagus, chicory, garlic, Jerusalem artichoke and onion. Inulin or fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS) are fibers in the form of starches that the human body cannot fully digest. When a person consumes prebiotics, the undigested portions provide nourishment for beneficial bacteria in the digestive tract. Inulins may promote the growth of favorable bacterial populations, such as bifidobacteria in the colon. Bifidobacteria may inhibit the growth of pathogenic bacteria, such as Clostridium perfringens and diarrheogenic strains of Escherichia coli.

Probiotic Blend (Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus plantarum, Bifodobacterium bifidum, Lactobacillus casei)
Probiotics, such as acidophilus or lactobacillus acidophilus, are strains of "beneficial" or "good" bacteria, known to help to maintain a healthy digestive tract. The digestive system naturally houses trillions of these good bacteria that directly help the body digest, modify and convert the foods we eat. Disruptions to these populations of probiotics (good bacteria) are common and must be kept at adequate levels in order to overwhelm other bacteria, which may begin to run rampant in the event the good bacteria levels decrease. In displacing other bacteria and yeast, acidophilus (and other beneficial bacteria like plantarun, bifidum and casei) may also play a significant role in maintaining a healthy immune system, and promoting a healthy colon. Such beneficial bacteria can be found naturally in foods, such as cultured yogurts and kefir. 

Both human and animal studies have demonstrated direct benefits of consistent ingestion of acidophilus and other beneficial bacteria on immune system function. Overall, the probiotic bacteria support the ability of the immune system to recognize and destroy invading organisms. Several key fighters of the immune system, including macrophages, immunoglobulins cytokines, are benefited by regular intake of beneficial bacteria. Consuming beneficial bacteria helps maintain healthy white blood cell counts. 

L-glutamine 1,000 mg
High-protein foods, including meat, fish, beans and dairy products are excellent sources of glutamine. L-glutamine is an amino acid derived from another amino acid, glutamic acid. Glutamine is a restorative amino acid that is used by the GI tract as its source of fuel. Glutamine helps to support overall health by helping to maintain normal cholesterol levels, helping to maintain normal blood glucose levels and promoting immune health. Heavy exercise, infection, surgery and trauma can all deplete the body's glutamine reserves, particularly in muscle cells. Because the cells of the intestine use glutamine for fuel, supplemental L-glutamine has been used to promote digestive health.

Chromium (100 mcg/serving; 200 mcg/day) 
Dietary chromium is an essential trace mineral assisting in the metabolism and use of carbohydrates and fat. Known as the glucose tolerance factor, chromium promotes the delivery of blood sugar to cells, thereby helping to maintain normal insulin activity. Chromium also helps maintain healthy levels of cholesterol and other blood lipids. Due to the role it plays in metabolism, chromium is commonly added to natural weight loss products.*

Phaseolus Vulgaris (White Kidney Bean Extract) (445 mg/serving; 890 mg/day) 
Research has shown that supplementation with white kidney bean extract promoted a greater reduction in body weight, body mass index (BMI) and fat mass. Scientifically known as Phaseolus vulgaris, white kidney bean is classified as an amylase inhibitor. Amylase is an enzyme that breaks down starchy carbohydrates into more easily absorbed sugars such as glucose. As individuals age, the ability to use carbohydrates from the diet slows down, causing increased glucose in the blood stream, leading to excess storage in the form of fat. Amylase plays a role in the digestion of carbohydrates and, subsequently, in the absorption of unwanted calories. Supplementation with white kidney bean extract allows certain carbohydrates to pass through the body undigested, stopping them from eventually being converted into fat. This bypass of undigested carbohydrates may reduce and normalize levels of simple sugars (glucose) in the blood.*

LeptiCore® (300 mg/serving; 600 mg/day) 
LeptiCore has been clinically proven to help reduce body weight, stored body fat, and waist and hip size. LeptiCore – a proprietary, safe and natural complex of plant-based polysaccharides and esterified fatty acids – has demonstrated the ability to enhance weight loss. LeptiCore targets critical mechanisms involved with body fat storage. LeptiCore supports the normal activity of leptin, a hormone involved with hunger signals. Imagine leptin as a mail messenger. Now imagine the brain as a mail box. With LeptiCore, leptin sensitivity is supported. LeptiCore supports the ability of leptin to enter the brain and signal the stomach that it is full. Supporting leptin sensitivity has the potential to increase satiety, decrease appetite, promote blood sugar balance and increase thermogenesis – a significant component of the metabolic rate.* 

GreenSelect® Phytosome® Green Tea Decaffeinated Extract (150 mg/serving; 300 mg/day) 
GreenSelect Phytosome is unlike the regular green teas you see on the market today. It is a combination of standardized decaffeinated green tea extract and soy phospholipids (lipids that are composed mainly of fatty acids, a phosphate group, and a simple organic molecule). It is designed to help protect the body from the negative effects of free radicals, and enhance the product’s bioavailability and efficacy.*

Green tea has long been studied for its powerful antioxidant properties. It is also believed to promote a healthy metabolic rate. Scientific research has also demonstrated that standardized green tea extracts promote fat oxidation, or the breakdown of stored fat for energy.*

Vitamin A (Beta-Carotene/Vitamin A pre-cursor) 10,000 IU
Vitamin A is a fat-soluble vitamin. Sources of vitamin A include organ meats (such as liver and kidney), egg yolks, butter, carrot juice, squash, sweet potatoes, spinach, peaches, fortified dairy products and cod liver oil. Vitamin A is also part of a family of compounds including retinol, retinal and beta-carotene. Beta-carotene, also known as pro-vitamin A, can be converted into vitamin A when additional levels are required. All the body’s tissues need vitamin A for general growth and repair. Vitamin A helps to promote healthy night vision, support normal bone growth and support an antioxidant defense and a healthy immune system.*

Vitamin C (Ascorbic Acid) 150 mg
Vitamin C is found in peppers (sweet, green, red, hot red and green chili), citrus fruits and brussel sprouts, cauliflower, cabbage, kale, collards, mustard greens, broccoli, spinach, guava, kiwi fruit, currants and strawberries. Nuts and grains contain small amounts of vitamin C. It is important to note that cooking destroys vitamin C activity.

Vitamin C is integral in supporting a healthy immune system, promoting cardiovascular health, helping to maintain healthy cholesterol levels and providing an antioxidant defense. The body does not manufacture vitamin C on its own, nor does it store it. Therefore, vitamin C must be acquired through diet and supplementation.*

Thiamin (Vitamin B1) 2.6 mg
Thiamin plays an important role in carbohydrate metabolism and nerve function. Thiamin is required for a healthy nervous system and assists in the production of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). It is used in the manufacture of hydrochloric acid, and therefore plays a part in digestion, increases energy and helps promote mental clarity.*

Pantothenic Acid (Vitamin B5) 20 mg
Pantothenic acid (B5) is the transfer agent for choline to acetylcholine, which promotes proper neurotransmitter activity in the brain. Pantothenic acid is also known as the anti-stress vitamin because it detoxifies brain tissue, helps relieve physical and emotional stress and plays a very important role in the secretion of hormones.*

Niacin (Vitamin B3) 40 mg
Niacin is a water-soluble vitamin necessary for many aspects of health, growth and reproduction. It is part of the vitamin B complex. Niacin supports the functioning of the digestive system, skin and nerves. It is also important for the conversion of food to energy. Niacin (also known as vitamin B-3) is found in dairy products, poultry, fish, lean meats, nuts and eggs as well as legumes and enriched breads and cereals.*

Vitamin B12 (Cyanocobalamin) 75 mcg
Vitamin B12 is naturally found in meats, liver, beef, pork, eggs, whole milk, cheese, whole wheat bread and fish. Vitamin B12 can only be found in animal products, with small amounts derived from fermented soy products such as miso and tempeh, and peanuts. It is essential that vegetarians consume a vitamin B12 supplement to maintain optimal health. Vitamin B12, when ingested, is stored in the liver and other tissues for later use. The synthetic form of vitamin B12, cyanocobalamin, is not derived from either plants or animals and is intrinsic in the maintenance of normal functioning body cells, especially those of the nervous system (protecting the sheaths of nerve cells), bone marrow and intestinal tract. These tissues are the first to exhibit signs of vitamin B12 depletion. Vitamin B12 itself is responsible for maintaining optimum energy levels as it plays a vital role in the Krebs energy cycle. It is also a great anti-aging ingredient and helps increase concentration.*

Folic Acid 400 mcg
Folic acid is mainly found in fruits and vegetables. Dark leafy greens, oranges, orange juice, beans and peas are the best sources as well as Brewer’s yeast, which supplies additional B-vitamins. Folic acid plays a key role by boosting the benefits of vitamin B12 supplementation. These two B-vitamins join forces and work together in maintaining normal red blood cells. Folic acid assists in the normal utilization of amino acids and proteins as well as promoting the normal construction of the material for DNA and RNA synthesis. Scientific studies have found that when working in tandem with folic acid, vitamin B12 is capable of promoting a healthy cardiovascular and nervous system.*

Riboflavin 5-Phosphate (Vitamin B2) 3 mg 
Vitamin B2 is found in liver, dairy products, dark green vegetables and some types of seafood. Vitamin B2 serves as a co-enzyme, working with other B vitamins. It promotes healthy blood and supports both the nervous system and normal human growth. It supports healthy skin, nails, hair growth and helps maintain a healthy thyroid. Vitamin B2 plays a crucial role in turning food into energy as a part of the electron transport chain, driving cellular energy on the micro-level. Vitamin B2 aids in the breakdown of fats while functioning as a cofactor or helper in activating B6 and folic acid. Vitamin B2 is water-soluble and cannot be stored by the body except in insignificant amounts; thus, it must be replenished daily. Under some conditions, vitamin B2 can act as an antioxidant. The riboflavin coenzymes are also important for the transformation of vitamin B6 and folic acid into their active forms and for the conversion of tryptophan into niacin.*

Pyridoxine HCl (Vitamin B6) 4 mg
Poultry, fish, whole grains and bananas are the main dietary sources of vitamin B6. Vitamin B6 is a co-factor required for protein and amino acid metabolism and helps maintain proper fluid balance. It also assists in the maintenance of healthy red and white blood cells. Vitamin B6 is required for hemoglobin synthesis. It is involved in the synthesis of neurotransmitters in brain and peripheral nerve cells, it has been recommended as a nutrient to enhance mental function, specifically mood, and it supports normal nerve conduction. Some athletic supplements include vitamin B6 because it promotes the conversion of glycogen to glucose, for energy in muscle tissue. Vitamin B6, when taken with folic acid, has been shown to help maintain normal plasma levels of homocysteine, which promotes optimal cardiovascular health. Vitamin B6 should be administered as a part of a complex of other B-vitamins for best results.* 

Vitamin D3 (Cholecalciferol) 1,000 IU
Regular sunlight exposure is the main way that most humans get their vitamin D. Food sources of vitamin D are vitamin D-fortified milk (100 IU per cup), cod liver oil, and fatty fish such as salmon. Small amounts are found in egg yolks and liver. Vitamin D promotes the absorption of calcium and phosphorus and supports the production of several proteins involved in calcium absorption and storage. Vitamin D works with calcium to promote hard, strong bones. It works to promote active transport of calcium out of the osteoblasts into the extra-cellular fluid and in the kidneys, promotes calcium and phosphate uptake by renal tubules. Vitamin D also promotes the normal absorption of dietary calcium and phosphate uptake by the intestinal epithelium. It promotes healthy growth and repair of tissues, and supports overall skin health.* 

Vitamin E (d-alpha-Tocopherol Succinate) 67 IU
The most valuable sources of dietary vitamin E include vegetable oils, margarine, nuts, seeds, avocados and wheat germ. Safflower oil contains large amounts of vitamin E (about two thirds of the RDA in ¼ cup) and there are trace amounts in corn oil and soybean oil. Vitamin E is actually a family of related compounds called tocopherols and tocotrienols. Vitamin E is available in a natural or synthetic form. In most cases, the natural and synthetic forms are identical except the natural form of vitamin E is better absorbed and retained in the body. The natural form of alpha-tocopherol is known as "d-alpha tocopherol." (The natural form is found in Isotonix® Multivitamin.) The synthetic "dl-" form is the most common form found in dietary supplements. For those individuals watching their dietary fat consumption, which is relatively common in the world of dieting, vitamin E intake is likely to be low, due to a reduced intake of foods with high fat content.*

The main health benefit of supplemental vitamin E comes from its immune-boosting antioxidant activity. It also supports normal healing and is known to promote cardiovascular health. Vitamin E is one of the most powerful fat-soluble antioxidants in the body. In turn, vitamin E protects cell membranes from free radical damage.*

Calcium (Lactate, Phosphate) 53.8 mg
Calcium is found in milk, cheese, yogurt, corn tortillas, Chinese cabbage (Napa), kale and broccoli. Calcium is an essential mineral with a wide range of biological roles. Calcium exists in bone primarily in the form of hydroxyapatite (Ca10 (PO4)6 (OH) 2). Hydroxyapatite comprises approximately 40 percent of the weight of bone. The skeleton has an obvious structural requisite for calcium. The skeleton also acts as a storehouse for calcium. Apart from being a major constituent of bones and teeth, calcium promotes normal muscle contraction, nerve conduction, cardiovascular health, the production of energy and helps maintain a healthy immune system.*

A sufficient daily calcium intake is necessary for maintaining bone density and maintaining healthy teeth and bones. Calcium has been shown to reduce the symptoms of PMS in women. When the body does not obtain enough calcium each day, it draws calcium from the bones causing them to thin, leading to osteoporosis. Osteoporosis is the age-related thinning of the bones, which can lead to a higher risk of broken hips, ribs, pelvis and other weakened bones. This is in addition to stooped posture associated with advanced age, which is caused by an accumulation of small fractures in the vertebrae.*

The PTH (parathyroid hormone) regulates the amount of calcium in the blood. High levels of calcium in the body have been associated with cardiovascular health in postmenopausal women and maintaining normal cholesterol levels. Low levels of calcium have been associated with reduced bone mass and osteoporosis.*

Chromium (Nicotinate) 120 mcg
Chromium is found naturally in some cereals, meats, poultry, brewer’s yeast, broccoli, prunes mushrooms, fish and beer. Chromium is an essential trace mineral that promotes normal glucose metabolism and regulation of insulin levels, and helps the body maintain of healthy blood levels of cholesterol and other fats. Chromium combines to form something in the body called glucose tolerance factor, or GTF, which promotes normal insulin activity in regulating blood sugar levels. Chromium has been shown to help reduce overall body fat, control hunger and suppress appetite. Many people in the weight-loss industry view chromium as an integral mineral in weight maintenance. Chromium may also contribute to an increase in lean body and muscle mass.*

Copper (Gluconate) 100 mcg
The richest sources of dietary copper derive from organ meats, seafood, nuts, seeds, wheat bran cereal, whole grain products and cocoa products. Copper may have some antioxidant properties and acts as a component of enzymes in iron metabolism. It is an essential trace mineral. Copper is needed in normal infant development, iron transport, bone strength, cholesterol metabolism, myocardial contractility, glucose metabolism, brain development and immune function.*

Iodine (Potassium Iodide) 150 mg
Iodine is found in most seafood and in iodized salt. It is a necessary component of thyroid hormones and helps regulate and maintain a properly functioning metabolism.*

Magnesium (Carbonate) 25 mg
Foods rich in magnesium include unpolished grains, nuts and green vegetables. Green, leafy vegetables are potent sources of magnesium because of their chlorophyll content. Meats, starches and milk are less rich sources of magnesium. Refined and processed foods are generally quite low in magnesium. The average daily magnesium intake in the U.S. for males nine years and older is estimated to be about 323 milligrams; for females nine years and older, it is estimated to be around 228 milligrams.

Magnesium is a component of the mineralized part of bone and is necessary for the metabolism of potassium and calcium in adults. It helps maintain normal levels of potassium, phosphorus, calcium, adrenaline and insulin. It is also important for the mobilization of calcium, transporting it inside the cell for further utilization. It plays a key role in the functioning of muscle and nervous tissue. Magnesium is necessary for the synthesis of all proteins, nucleic acids, nucleotides, cyclic adenosine monophosphate, lipids and carbohydrates.*

Magnesium is required for release of energy and it promotes the normal regulation of body temperature and proper nerve function, it helps the body handle stress, and it promotes a healthy metabolism. Magnesium works together with calcium to promote the normal regulation of the heart and blood pressure. Importantly, magnesium is also required by the body to build healthy bones and teeth, and promotes proper muscle development. It works together with calcium and vitamin D to help keep bones strong. Magnesium also promotes cardiovascular health by supporting normal platelet activity and helping to maintain normal cholesterol levels.*

Manganese (Gluconate) 2 mg
Manganese is a mineral found in large quantities in both plant and animal matter. The most valuable dietary sources of manganese include whole grains, nuts, leafy vegetables and teas. Manganese is concentrated in the bran of grains, which is often removed during processing. There are several forms of supplementary manganese including manganese gluconate, manganese sulfate, manganese ascorbate, and manganese amino acid chelates.

Only trace amounts of this element can be found in human tissue. Manganese is predominantly stored in the bones, liver, kidney and pancreas. It supports the normal formation of connective tissue, bones, blood-clotting factors and sex hormones. It promotes normal fat and carbohydrate metabolism, calcium absorption and blood sugar regulation. Manganese also promotes normal brain and nerve function.*

Potassium (Bicarbonate) 108 mg
Foods rich in potassium include fresh vegetables and fruits such as bananas, oranges, cantaloupe, avocado, raw spinach, cabbage and celery. Potassium is an essential macromineral that helps to keep fluid balance. It also plays a role in a wide variety of biochemical and physiological processes. Among other things, it supports normal nerve impulses, cardiac, skeletal and smooth muscle contractions, energy production, synthesis of nucleic acids, and helps maintain intracellular tonicity and normal blood pressure. Potassium promotes normal muscle relaxation and insulin release. It also promotes glycogen and protein synthesis. Potassium is an electrolyte that promotes proper heartbeat. Potassium is important in releasing energy from protein, fat, and carbohydrates during metabolism.*

Potassium also helps regulate water balance and assists recuperative powers. Potassium supports the normal elimination of wastes. Potassium promotes normal healing and generally contributes to a sense of well-being. Potassium is stored in the muscles.*

Selenium (Amino Acid Chelate) 55 mcg
The best dietary sources of selenium include nuts, unrefined grains, brown rice, wheat germ, and seafood. In the body, selenium functions as part of an antioxidant enzyme called glutathione peroxidase as well as promoting normal growth and proper usage of iodine in thyroid functioning. Selenium also supports the antioxidant effect of vitamin E and is often added to vitamin E supplements. As part of the antioxidant, glutathione peroxidase, selenium plays a direct role in the body’s ability to protect cells from damage by free radicals.*

Silicon (Dioxide) 13.2 mg
The richest sources of silicon are cereal products and unrefined grains with high fiber content. Most of the silicon in the body is located in connective tissues, bone, tendons, the trachea, the aorta, skin, hair and nails.

Zinc (Lactate) 7.5 mg
Zinc is largely found in fortified cereals, red meats, eggs, poultry and certain seafood, including oysters. It is a component of multiple enzymes and proteins. It is also involved in the regulation of gene expression. Zinc is an essential trace mineral that has functions in approximately 300 different enzyme reactions. Thus, zinc plays a part in almost all biochemical pathways and physiological processes. More than 90 percent of the body’s zinc is stored in the bones and muscles, but zinc is also found in virtually all body tissues. It has been claimed that zinc supports normal healing and the immune system, promotes a healthy prostate gland and supports healthy sperm quality. Because zinc is involved in such a great number of enzymatic processes it has been found to support a large range of functions including digestion, energy production, growth, cellular repair, collagen synthesis, bone strength, cognitive function and carbohydrate metabolism.*

Iron Phosphate† (SunActive Fe™)‡ 15 mg
Iron is mainly found in citrus fruits, tomatoes, beans, peas, fortified bread and grain products such as cereal (non-heme iron sources). Beef, liver, organ meats and poultry comprise the heme iron sources. The heme iron sources are more absorbable than the non-heme type of iron. Iron is an essential mineral. It is a component of hemoglobin, the protein that carries oxygen in the blood, and myoglobin, another protein that carries oxygen in muscle tissue. Iron is required in red blood cell formation.*

Iron plays a part in many imperative biochemical pathways and enzyme systems including those involved with energy metabolism, neurotransmitter production (serotonin and dopamine), collagen formation and immune system function. Young children, adult men and elderly women probably do not require supplemental iron in their diets and should consult their physician before taking iron supplements (due to the risk of excessive iron). Iron has been found to promote normal oxygen transport, thus improving exercise capacity, stimulate the immune system, increase energy levels and promote normal production of neurotransmitters and collagen.

†Found only in nutraMetrix Isotonix Multivitamin with Iron
‡SunActive Fe™ is a registered trademark of Taiyo International, Inc.

Biotin (Vitamin B7) 300 mcg
Biotin can be found in food sources, such as egg yolks, peanuts, beef liver, milk (10 mcg/cup), cereals, almonds and Brewer’s yeast. Biotin is used in healthy cell growth, the production of fatty acids, metabolism of fats and amino acids. It plays a role in the Citric acid cycle, which is the process in which biochemical energy is generated during aerobic respiration. Biotin not only assists in various metabolic chemical conversions but also helps to transfer carbon dioxide. Biotin is also helpful in maintaining a steady blood sugar level. Biotin is often recommended for strengthening hair and nails.

Science

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  • Anderson, R. Effects of chromium on body composition and weight loss. Nutrition Reviews. 56(9): 266-270, 1998.
  • Blundell, J., et al.  Regulation of appetite: role of leptin in signaling systems for drive and satiety.  International Journal of Obesity.  25(Supplement 1): 529-534, 2001.
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  • Celleno, L., et al. A dietary supplement containing standardized Phaseolus vulgaris extract influences body composition of overweight men and women. International Journal of Medical Sciences. 4(1):45-52, 2007.
  • Cohen P., et al. Selective deletion of leptin receptor in neurons leads to obesity. Journal of Clinical Investigation. 108(8):1113-21, 2001.
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  •  Flegal, K., et al. Prevalence and trends in obesity among US adults, 1999-2008. JAMA. 303(3):235-241, 2010.
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  • Martin, J., et al. Chromium picolinate supplementation attenuates body weight gain and increases insulin sensitivity in subjects with type 2 diabetes. Diabetes Care. 29(8): 1826-1832, 2006.Obiro, W., et al. The nutraceutical role of Phaseolus vulgaris alpha-amylase inhibitor. British Journal of Nutrition. 100: 1-12, 2008.
  • Pittler, M. and Ernst, E. Dietary supplements for body-weight reduction: a systematic review. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 79(4): 529-536, 2004.
  • Preuss, H. and Anderson, R. Chromium update: examining recent literature 1997-1998. Current Opinion in Clinical Nutrition and Metabolic Care. 1(6): 509-512, 1998.
  • Preuss H. Bean amylase inhibitor and other carbohydrate absorption blockers: effects on diabesity and general health. Journal of the American College of Nutrition. 28(3):266-76, 2009.Qi, Y., et al. Adiponectin acts in the brain to decrease body weight. Nature Medicine. 10(5):524-9, 2004.
  • Rabinovitz, H., et al. Effect of chromium supplementation on blood glucose and lipid levels in type 2 diabetes mellitus elderly patients. International Journal of Vitamin and Nutrition Research. 74(3):178-82, 2004.
  • Sinha, M. Evidence of free and bound leptin in human circulation. Studies in lean and obese subjects and during short-term fasting. Journal of Clinical Investigation. 98(6):1277-82, 1996. 
  • Sparti, A., et al. Effect of diets high or low in unavailable and slowly digestible carbohydrates on the pattern of 24-h substrate oxidation and feeling of hunger in humans.  The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.  73: 1462-1468, 2000.TalYeh, G., et al. Systematic review of herbs and dietary supplements for glycemic control in diabetes. Diabetes Care. 26(4): 1277-1294, 2003.
  • Udani J., et al. Blocking carbohydrate absorption and weight loss: a clinical trial using Phase 2 brand proprietary fractionated white bean extract. Alternative Medicine Review.  9(1):63-9, 2004.
  • Udani, J and Singh B. Blocking carbohydrate absorption and weight loss: a clinical trial using a proprietary fractionated white bean extract. Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine. 13(4):32-7, 2007.
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Scientific Studies Which Support NutriClean® 7-Day Cleansing System:  

  • Agarwal K et al.  Feasibility studies to control acute diarrhea in children by feeding fermented milk preparations Actimel and Indian Dahi. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 56(Supplement 4): S56-S59, 2002.
  • Akisu M et al.  The role of dietary supplementation with L-glutamine in inflammatory mediator release and intestinal injury in hypoxia/reoxygenation- induced experimental necrotizing enterocolitis.  Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism.  47(6):262-266, 2003.
  • Arunachalam K et al. Enhancement of natural immune function by dietary consumption of Bifidobacterium lactis (HN019). European Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 54(3):263-7, 2000.
  • Brighenti F et al.  Effect of consumption of a ready-to-eat breakfast cereal containing inulin on the intestinal milieu and blood lipids in healthy male volunteers.  European Journal of Clinical Nutrition.  53(9):726-733, 1999.
  • Cashman K. A prebiotic substance persistently enhances intestinal calcium absorption and increases bone mineralization in young adolescents. Nutrition Reviews. 64: 189-96, 2006.
  • Cetinkaya, A., et al.  N-Acetylcysteine Ameliorates Methotrexate-Induced Oxidative Liver Damage in Rats. Medical Science Monitor. 12(8): 274-278, 2006.
  • Cummings J et al. A study of fructo oligosaccharides in the prevention of travellers' diarrhoea. Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics. 15:1139-1145, 2001.
  • Cunningham-Rundles S et al. Probiotics and immune response. American Journal of Gastroenterology. 95(1 Suppl):S22-5, 2000.
  • Davidson M et al. Effects of dietary insulin in serum lipids in men and women with hypercholesterolaemia. Nutrition Research 3:503-17, 1998.
  • de Roos N et al. Effects of probiotic bacteria on diarrhea, lipid metabolism, and carcinogenesis: a review of papers published between 1988 and 1998. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 71(2):405-11, 2000.
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  • Flickinger E. Glucose-based oligosaccharides exhibit different in vitro fermentation patterns and affect in vivo apparent nutrient digestibility and microbial populations in dogs. Journal of Nutrition 130:1267-73, 2000.
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  • Gibson G et al.  Selective stimulation of bifidobacteria in the human colony by oligofructose and inulin.  Gastroenterology.  108:975-982, 1995.
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  • Kren, V. and Walterova, D.  Silybin and Silymarin--New Effects and Applications. Biomedical papers of the Medical Faculty of the University Palack

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  • Arthur JR. Functional indicators of iodine and selenium status. Proc Nutr Soc. 1999 May;58(2):507-12.
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Scientific Studies Which Support Isotonix OPC-3®:

  • Bayeta, E., et al. Pycnogenol inhibits generation of inflammatory mediators in macrophages. Nutrition Research 20: 249-259, 2000.
  • Blazsó, G., et al. Anti-inflammatory and superoxide radical scavenging activities of a procyanidins containing extract from the bark of Pinus pinaster Sol. and its fractions. Pharm Pharmacol Lett 3: 217-20, 1994
  • Cesarone, M., et al. Improvement in Circulation and in Cardiovascular Risk Factors With a Proprietary Isotonic Bioflavanoid Formula OPC-3.  Journal Angiology 59: 408-414, 2008.
  • Cho, K., et al. Effect of bioflavonoids extracted from the bark of Pinus maritima on proinflammatory cytokine interlukin-1 production in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated RAW 264. 7.  Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology 168: 64-71, 2000.
  • Cho, K., et al. Inhibition mechanisms of bioflavonoids extracted from the bark of Pinus maritima on the expression of proinflammatory cytokines. Annals of the NYAcademy of Sciences 928: 141-156, 2001.
  • Devaraj, S., et al. Supplementation with a pine bark extract rich in polyphenols increases plasma antioxidant capacity and alters the plasma lipoprotein profile. Lipids 37:931-4, 2002.
  • Fine, AM, Oligomeric proanthocyanidin complexes: history, structure, and phytopharmaceutical applications. Altern Med Rev 5:144-51, 2000.
  • Fitzpatrick, D., et al. Endothelium-dependent vascular effects of Pycnogenol. Journal of Cardiovascular Pharmacology 32: 509-515, 1998.
  • Frankel, E., et al. Inhibition of oxidation of human low-density lipoprotein by phenolic substances in red wine. Lancet 341: 454-7, 1993.
  • Freedman, J., et al. Select flavonoids and whole juice from purple grapes inhibit platelet function and enhance nitric oxide release. Circulation 103:2792-8, 2001.
  • Frémont, L. Biological effects of resveratrol. Life Sciences 66: 663-673, 2000.
  • Gulati, O. Pycnogenol® in venous disorders: a review. European Bulletin of Drug Research 7: 1-13, 1999.
  • Hosseini, S., et al. Pycnogenol® in the management of asthma. Journal of Medicinal Food 4: 201-209, 2001. HHHh
  • Kohama, T., et al. The treatment of gynecological disorders with Pycnogenol®. European Bulletin of Drug Research 7: 30-32, 1999.
  • Kohama, T., et al. Analgesic efficacy of French maritime pine bark extract in dysmenorrhea. Journal of Reproductive Medicine 49: 828-32, 2004.
  • Liu, X., et al. Antidiabetic effect of Pycnogenol French maritime pine bark extract in patients with diabetes type II. Life Sci 75:2505-13, 2004.
  • Liu, X., et al. French maritime pine bark extract pycnogenol dose-dependently lowers glucose in type 2 diabetic patients. Diabetes Care 27: 839, 2004.
  • Manna, S., et al. Resveratrol suppresses TNF-Induced activation of nuclear transcription factors NF-kB, activator protein-1, and apoptosis: potential role of reactive oxygen intermediates and lipid peroxidation. The Journal of Immunology 164: 6509-19, 2000.
  • Maritim, A., et al. Effects of pycnogenol treatment on oxidative stress in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. J Biochem Mol Toxicol 17:193-9, 2003.
  • Miyagi, Y., et al. Inhibition of human low-density lipoprotein oxidation by flavonoids in red wine and grape juice. Am J Cardiol 0:1627-31, 1997.
  • Monograph. Vaccinium myrtillus (bilberry). Altern Med Rev 6:500-4, 2001.
  • Murias M., et al. Resveratrol analogues as selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors: synthesis and structure-activity relationship. Bioorg Med Chem 12: 5571-8, 2004.
  • Nuttall SL, Kendall MJ, Bombardelli E, Morazzoni P. An evaluation of the antioxidant activity of a standardized grape seed extract, Leucoselect. J Clin Pharm Ther 23: 385-89, 1998.
  • Packer, L., et al. Antioxidant activity and biologic properties of a procyanidin-rich extract from pine (Pinus maritima) bark, pycnogenol. Free Radic Biol Med 27:704-24, 1999. Review.
  • Rohdewald, P. A review of the French maritime pine bark extract (Pycnogenol®), a herbal medication with a diverse clinical pharmacology. Int J Clin Pharmacol Ther 40:158-68, 2002. Review.
  • Rohdewald, P. Pycnogenol®. In "Flavonoids in Health and Disease". Ed. Catherine Rice-Evans and Lester Packer. New York:  Marcel Dekker, Inc., 1998. 405-19.
  • Roseff, S., et al. Improvement in sperm quality and function with French maritime pine tree bark extract. Journal Reproductive Medicine 47: 821-4, 2002.
  • Roseff, S., et al. Improvement of sperm quality by Pycnogenol®. European Bulletin of Drug Research 7: 33-6, 1999.
  • Saito, M., et al. Antiulcer activity of grape seed extract and procyanidins. J Agric  Food Chem 46: 1460-4, 1998.
  • Schönlau, F., et al. Pycnogenol® for diabetic retinopathy. International Ophthalmology 24: 161-171, 2002.
  • Schönlau, F., et al. The cosmeceutical Pycnogenol®. J Appl Cosmetology 20: 241-6, 2002.
  • Segger, D. and Schönlau, F. Supplementation with Evelle® improves skin smoothness and elasticity in a double blind, placebo-controlled study with 62 women. Journal of Dermatological Treatment 15:222-26, 2004.
  • Shi, J., et al. Polyphenolics in grape seeds-biochemistry and functionality. J Med Food 6:291-9, 2003. Review.
  • Sharma, S., et al. Pycnogenol® inhibits the release of histamine from mast cells. Phytotherapy Research 17: 66-69, 2003.
  • Spadea, L., et al. Treatment of vascular retinopathies with Pycnogenol®. Phytotherapy Research 15: 219-23, 2001.
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FAQ

What role does digestive health play in achieving and maintaining a healthy weight?
The digestive tract is of utmost importance, although many of us fail to notice this fact. The main function of the digestive system is, of course, to process and eliminate food and food by-products. It is an active organ that is also involved in immunity, acting as a barrier between you and the outside world with 60 percent of the lympathic system interwoven into the intestines. It is the home for healthy flora that helps to maintain proper balance. 

Digestive health determines water and nutrient absorption by the body, and the buildup of toxins can interfere with the body’s natural metabolism. The digestive system actively transports nutrients into the body and helps to maintain the water/electrolyte balance. It serves to aid in the elimination of wastes through daily bowel movements, urination, perspiration and the breath. The consequence of second-rate digestive functioning may actually result in separate health concerns that may seemingly have nothing to do with the digestive system itself, yet flow from the system’s large involvement in a plethora of other processes.

Various health issues can stem back to poor digestive health. One huge health concern related to digestive system health is constipation. Sixteen percent of all Americans experience occasional constipation. More women are affected in a ratio or 2 to 1. Elderly Americans experience over twice the rate and poor diet, poor hydration and lack of exercise all contribute to suboptimal bowel performance. With a prudent cleansing with the TLS Detox Kit, one can be sure they are doing the most for their digestive system health - crucial in overall good health.

How does a detox work?
During day-to-day processes, your body may grow less able to naturally flush out all its self-produced toxic waste. When toxins are retained and stored in the body the condition is called toxemia. Detox can help purge the blood and tissues from toxic residue, but detox also cleanses and rejuvenates the entire excretory system and clears clogged bowels and blocked lungs. It also flushes out sluggish kidneys and the bladder. With caustic pollutants like ammonia or excessive fatty acids shed from the body, your organ systems can start functioning properly, thusly kick starting your metabolism and setting the stage for healthy weight loss.

What else can I do to enhance my results while using the TLS Detox Kit?
To enhance the effects of the TLS Detox Kit cleanse, you should increase your intake of raw fruits, vegetables. Eat more natural foods and increase your exercise. You should limit caffeinated beverages to one serving or cup of coffee per day. Cleansing tends to boost energy levels. Reduce your protein intake. Protein contains ammonia, which must be filtered by the liver. Limit your intake of eggs and meats (especially red meats) to decrease strain on the liver. Refined sugars and carbs should be avoided, including cookies, crackers and other foods in a bag or box to decrease stimulation of insulin secretion during the cleanse. Also, stay away from artificial sweeteners and MSG, a common additive, and any other ingredients that do not occur naturally in foods to avoid additional stress on the liver. You must eliminate the following things from your lifestyle during the detox cleanse:

  • Processed foods — such as luncheon meats, boxed meals, white bread and cheese foods
  • Smoking — cigarettes contain thousands of toxic chemicals. Please refrain from smoking if at all possible.
  • Soft drinks — phosphoric acid can upset the pH balance in your body in addition to pulling much needed calcium from the bones when consumed in large quantities. Soft drinks can also be high in sugar. 
  • Hydrogenated oils — foods are hydrogenated to increase their stability and storage time, but this process increases the saturation of the fats in these foods. Margarines, spreads, cooking fats and commercially baked foods contain hydrogenated fats (or trans fats), which can increase cardiovascular risk. 

Who should use the TLS Detox Kit?
If you are starting or renewing your weight loss efforts, detox can help promote or “kick start” your metabolism. Especially if you are experiencing a plateau in your weight loss efforts and your activity levels and eating patterns have not changed, starting a detoxification program may be the perfect option for you!

Who should not use the TLS Detox Kit?
Do not use if you have or develop diarrhea, loose stools or abdominal pain because rhubarb, buckthorn and Cascara sagrada may worsen these conditions and be harmful to your health. Consult your physician if you have frequent diarrhea. If you are pregnant, nursing, taking medication or have a medical condition, consult your physician before using this product. Do not use this product if you are experiencing abdominal pain, nausea or vomiting. If you have gall bladder problems or have had your gall bladder removed, you should not use this product. If you are allergic to any of the ingredients in these three products, you should not use the TLS Detox Kit. Individuals who are currently using or have recently discontinued use of Warfarin (Coumadin) or other anticoagulant drugs should not use the TLS Detox Kit. If you have scleroderma (systemic sclerosis), you should consult your physician before taking any type of fiber product. Individuals with diabetes should not take this product as certain ingredients can lower blood sugar. Consult your physician if you have experienced a sudden change in bowel habits that has persisted for two weeks prior to taking this product.

This product is best if taken for a period of one week. Do not take it for longer than one week unless directed by your physician. Rectal bleeding or failure to have bowel movement after use of cleansing products may indicate a serious condition. If you experience these effects, discontinue use immediately and consult your physician.

REVIEW SNAPSHOT®

by PowerReviews
TLS Weight Loss SolutionTLS Detox Kit
 
5.0

(based on 1 review)

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Reviewed by 1 customer

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(9 of 11 customers found this review helpful)

 
5.0

6 Lbs down!

By KristinaC

from USA

Comments about TLS Weight Loss Solution TLS Detox Kit:

I started this kit a week ago and feel so energized now. I lost 6 lbs and the vitamins and Core are keeping me still on track to los more! 2013 is going to be healthy feel great year!

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