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Isotonix Essentials™ Women's Health

By Isotonix®

Sold by Isotonix®

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Isotonix Essentials™ Women's Health

By Isotonix®

Sold by Isotonix®

$79.95

$1.60 Cashback

Single Box (30 Packets)

Description

Product Brochure

As jetsetters and go-getters, women are constantly on the move. There’s a lot to think about all the time, so maintaining a healthy lifestyle can get pushed to the back burner. However, your health should take precedence. Cardiovascular health, skin and bone health are extremely important concerns. Want to take charge of your wellness, but need something to keep up with the super woman lifestyle you’re leading?*

Look and feel vibrant with Isotonix Essentials™ Women’s Health custom blend formula. More than a multivitamin, Women’s Health supports a healthy complexion, helps support healthy bones, teeth, joints and skin, and provides antioxidant protection for your entire body. Women will benefit from receiving the foundation of nutrients that deliver vibrancy, while supporting cardiovascular and cognitive health and helping to maintain healthy collagen production.* 

So while you’re managing life like a champ, let Women’s Health be there to back you up!*

*These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product(s) is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

Benefits

  • Supports a healthy complexion
  • Promotes healthy functioning of the skin at a cellular level, which results in health, vibrant-looking skin
  • Helps maintain normal cell health
  • Helps maintain healthy collagen production
  • Provides antioxidant protection for the entire body
  • Protects the body from free radicals
  • Helps support health bones, teeth, joints and skin
  • Helps maintain normal muscle and nerve function
  • Supports a healthy immune system
  • Supports cardiovascular health
  • Promotes cognitive health
  • Contains no gluten, wheat, soy, yeast, artificial flavor, salt, preservatives or milk

FAQ

What does Isotonix® mean?
Isotonix® dietary supplements are delivered in an isotonic liquid solution. This means that the body has less work to do in obtaining maximum absorption. The isotonic state of the suspension allows nutrients to pass efficiently into the small intestine and be rapidly delivered into the bloodstream. With Isotonix® products, little nutritive value is lost, making the absorption of nutrients highly efficient while delivering maximum results.*

Who should use Isotonix Essentials™ Women’s Health?
Females 18 years of age and older who want to support healthy skin and body, specific to women’s needs.*

How do I take Isotonix Essentials™ Women’s Health?
Pour contents of packet into a cup. Add 8 fl. oz of water into the cup and stir.

How often should I use 
Isotonix Essentials™ Women’s Health?
As a dietary supplement, take once daily or as directed by your healthcare provider. 

What ingredients make this supplement beneficial to women?
  • Magnesium (Glycinate) makes Women’s Health bioavailable and supports cognitive health*
  • Nutrients in Women’s Health help support collagen production, strong hair and nails*
How is Isotonix Essentials™ Women’s Health different from other similar supplement products on the market?
Many women’s health supplements focus on botanicals or herbs that have a complex mechanism of action. More than many other products on the market, Isotonix Essentials™ Women's Health meets a diversity of female needs.* 

Are there any contraindications or warnings for this product? 
If you are currently using any prescription drugs, have an ongoing medical condition or are pregnant or breastfeeding, you should consult your healthcare provider before using this product.

*These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product(s) is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

Directions For Use


1. Pour contents of packet into a cup.

2. Add 8 fl. oz. of water into the cup and stir.

As a dietary supplement, take once daily or as directed by your healthcare provider. Maximum absorption occurs when taken on an empty stomach. This product is isotonic only if the specified amounts of water and powder are used.

Directions For Use  

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Ingredients

Calcium (Lactate, Sulfate): 557 mg
Calcium is found in milk, cheese, yogurt, corn tortillas, napa (Chinese cabbage), kale and broccoli. Calcium is an essential mineral with a wide range of biological roles. Calcium exists in bone, primarily in the form of hydroxyapatite (Ca10 (PO4)6 (OH)2). Hydroxyapatite comprises approximately 40 percent of the weight of bone. The skeleton has an obvious structural requisite for calcium. The skeleton also acts as a storehouse for calcium. Apart from being a major constituent of bones and teeth, calcium supports normal muscle contraction and nerve conduction, supports normal heartbeat, blood coagulation and glandular secretion, promotes the production of energy and helps maintain normal immune function.*

Calcium is essential for healthy bones and teeth. A sufficient daily calcium intake is necessary for maintaining bone density. Calcium has been shown to reduce symptoms of PMS in women.* Calcium also may play a role in promoting cardiovascular health.

Magnesium (Citrate, Glycinate, Carbonate): 450 mg
A women’s body has unique needs based on her age, weight and physical fitness. While some women experience the effects of premenstrual syndrome, others need help as it relates to menopause, while every woman could use more energy. Isotonix Essentials™ Women’s Health offers magnesium in a glycinate form, which helps support cognitive health.*

Magnesium is a component of the mineralized part of bone and supports the normal metabolism of potassium and calcium in adults. It helps maintain normal levels of potassium, phosphorus, calcium, adrenaline and insulin. It also promotes the normal mobilization of calcium, transporting it inside the cell for further utilization. It supports normal muscle function and nerve tissue. Magnesium promotes the normal synthesis of proteins, nucleic acids, nucleotides, cyclic adenosine monophosphate, lipids and carbohydrates.*

Magnesium works together with calcium to help maintain normal blood pressure. Importantly, magnesium also supports the body’s ability to build healthy bones and teeth, and promotes proper muscle development. It works together with calcium and vitamin D to help keep bones strong. Magnesium also promotes cardiovascular health by supporting normal platelet activity and helping to maintain normal cholesterol levels.*

Magnesium supports the normal release of energy from food during metabolism, regulation of body temperature and proper nerve function. Importantly, magnesium also promotes healthy bones, teeth and normal muscle development. It works together with calcium and vitamin D to promote strong bones. *

Foods rich in magnesium include unpolished grains, nuts and green vegetables. Green, leafy vegetables are potent sources of magnesium because of their chlorophyll content. Meats, starches, milk, refined and processed foods contain low amounts of magnesium. Recent research shows that many American diets are magnesium deficient.*

Potassium (Bicarbonate): 320 mg
Potassium is an electrolyte stored in the muscles. Foods rich in potassium include bananas, oranges, cantaloupe, avocado, raw spinach, cabbage and celery. Potassium is an essential macromineral that helps maintain fluid balance in the body. It also supports a wide variety of biochemical and physiological processes. Among other things, potassium promotes the transmission of nerve impulses, the contraction of cardiac, skeletal and smooth muscle, the production of energy, the synthesis of nucleic acids and the maintenance of normal blood pressure.*

In 1928, it was first suggested that high potassium intake could help maintain cardiovascular health. Potassium promotes normal muscle relaxation and helps maintain normal insulin release. It also promotes glycogen and protein synthesis. Potassium is an electrolyte that promotes normal heartbeat. Potassium promotes the normal release of energy from protein, fat and carbohydrates during metabolism. Potassium helps maintain normal water balance, supports recovery from exercise and the elimination of wastes. Sodium and potassium are two of the most important ions in maintaining the homeostatic equilibrium of the body fluids.*

Vitamin C (Ascorbic Acid): 109 mg 
Vitamin C, also known as ascorbic acid, is a water-soluble vitamin that has a number of biological functions. Vitamin C is found in peppers (sweet, green, red, hot red and green chili), citrus fruits and brussel sprouts, cauliflower, cabbage, kale, collards, mustard greens, broccoli, spinach, guava, kiwi fruit, currants and strawberries. Nuts and grains contain small amounts of vitamin C. It is important to note that cooking destroys vitamin C activity. 
Vitamin C supports normal tissue repair, healing and dopamine production. Vitamin C is integral in supporting a healthy immune system, promoting cardiovascular health, helping to maintain healthy cholesterol levels and providing an antioxidant defense. The body does not manufacture vitamin C on its own, nor does it store it. Therefore, Vitamin C must be acquired through diet and supplementation.*

Vitamin E Acetate (d-Alpha-Tocopheryl-Acetate): 53 mg
The most valuable sources of dietary vitamin E include vegetable oils, margarine, nuts, seeds, avocados and wheat germ. Safflower oil contains large amounts of vitamin E (about two thirds of the RDA in ¼ cup), and smaller amounts are found in corn oil and soybean oil. Vitamin E is actually a family of related compounds called tocopherols and tocotrienols. 

Vitamin E was discovered in the early 1930s. It is available in a natural or synthetic form. In most cases, the natural and synthetic form of vitamins and minerals are identical. However, the natural form of Vitamin E is superior, in terms of absorption and retention in the body.
The natural form of alpha-tocopherol, known as d-alpha tocopherol, is contained in Isotonix Essentials™ Women’s Blend. The synthetic form is the most common form found in dietary supplements. It is in the consumer's best interest to choose a product that contains the superior (and more expensive) natural form. For those individuals watching their dietary fat consumption, which is relatively common in the world of dieting, vitamin E intake is likely to be low, due to a reduced intake of foods with a higher fat content.*

The health benefits of supplemental vitamin E are derived from its support of immune health and antioxidant activity. Vitamin E protects cell membranes from free radicals. It is also helpful in promoting normal healing and is known to help maintain a healthy cardiovascular system. Vitamin E is one of the most powerful fat-soluble antioxidants in the body. High servings of vitamin E have been shown to promote normal platelet activity.*

Niacinamide (Vitamin B3): 30 mg NE
Niacin supports the proper functioning of the digestive system, skin and nerves. It works with vitamins B1 and B2 to promote the conversion of food to energy. Niacin is found in dairy products, poultry, fish, lean meats, nuts, eggs, legumes, and enriched breads and cereals.*

D-Calcium Pantothenate (Vitamin B5): 25 mg
Pantothenic acid (B5) promotes proper neurotransmitter activity in the brain. Pantothenic acid is also known as the anti-stress vitamin, and supports the normal secretion of hormones essential for optimal health.*

Pine Bark Extract (Pycnogenol®): 20 mg
Pycnogenol® is a natural plant extract from the bark of the maritime pine tree, which grows exclusively along the coast of southwest France in Les Landes de Gascogne. This unspoiled and natural forest environment is the unique source of pine bark. Pycnogenol® is one of the most researched ingredients in the natural product marketplace. Published findings have demonstrated Pycnogenol’s® wide array of beneficial effects on the body. Pine bark extract is a combination of procyanidins, bioflavonoids and organic acids.

The extract has three basic properties — it is a powerful antioxidant, selectively binds to collagen and elastin, and promotes the normal production of endothelial nitric oxide, which promotes the normal dilation of blood vessels.*

As one of the most powerful scavengers of free radicals, Pycnogenol® combats many free radicals. It helps support healthy blood platelet activity, helps maintain healthy blood glucose levels, reduces mild menstrual cramping and abdominal pain, helps maintain joint flexibility, promotes cardiovascular health, promotes healthy sperm quality, helps maintain healthy cholesterol levels and supports a healthy complexion.*

Pycnogenol® is the registered trademark of Horphag Research, Ltd., and is protected by U.S. patent numbers 4,698,360; 5,720,956; and 6,372,266.

Grape Seed Extract: 12.5 mg
Grape seed extract is typically extracted from the seeds of red grapes (instead of white), which have a high content of compounds known as oligomeric proanthocyanidins (OPCs). Grape seed extract is extremely rich in polyphenols, compounds with high antioxidant activity. Grape seed extract has been found to help maintain healthy cholesterol levels.*

Red Wine Extract: 12.5 mg
Red wine extract is a powerful antioxidant. It is found in grape vines, roots, seeds and stalks, with the highest concentration in the skins. The antioxidant properties of red wine extract contribute to maintaining healthy circulation by strengthening capillaries, arteries and veins, and promoting overall cardiovascular health.*

In the late 1990s, scientists took note of a phenomenon among the French. There were very low rates of cardiovascular problems in the provinces where residents consistently ate high fat foods and drank red wine. Scientists concluded that the protective properties of red wine have helped the French maintain cardiovascular health for years and subsequent scientific studies have further shown that the OPCs found in red wine are particularly beneficial for protecting the heart and blood vessels.*

Bilberry Extract: 12.5 mg
Bilberry extract is derived from the leaves and berry-like fruit of a common European shrub closely related to the blueberry. Extracts of the ripe berry are known to contain flavonoid pigments known as anthocyanins, which are powerful antioxidants. Scientific studies confirm that bilberry extract supports healthy vision and venous circulation. Bilberry extract helps maintain healthy circulation by strengthening capillaries, arteries and veins.*

Citrus Extract (Bioflavonoids): 12.5 mg
Bioflavonoids are antioxidants found in certain plants that act as light filters, which protect delicate DNA chains and other important macromolecules by absorbing ultraviolet radiation. They have been found to promote cardiovascular health, help maintain healthy circulation by strengthening capillaries, arteries and veins, and demonstrate anti-inflammatory activity.*

Iron (Pyrophosphate, SunActive® Fe): 10 mg
Iron is mainly found in citrus fruits, tomatoes, beans, peas, fortified bread and grain products such as cereal (non-heme iron sources). Beef, liver, organ meats and poultry comprise the heme iron sources. The heme iron sources are more absorbable than the non-heme type of iron. Iron is an essential mineral. It is a component of hemoglobin, the protein that carries oxygen in the blood, and myoglobin, another protein that carries oxygen in muscle tissue. Iron promotes normal red blood cell formation.*

Iron supports many imperative biochemical pathways and enzyme systems including those involved with energy metabolism, neurotransmitter production (serotonin and dopamine), collagen formation and immune system function. Young children, adult men and elderly women are less likely to require supplemental iron in their diets and should consult their physician before taking iron supplements (due to the risk of excessive iron). Iron has been found to promote normal oxygen transport, thus improving exercise capacity, stimulate the immune system, increase energy levels and promote normal production of neurotransmitters and collagen.*

SunActive Fe® is a registered trademark of Taiyo International, Inc.

Vitamin B6 (Pyrodoxine HCl, Pyridoxal-5-Phosphate): 8 mg
Poultry, fish, whole grains and bananas are the main dietary sources of vitamin B6. B6 supports normal protein and amino acid metabolism, and helps maintain proper fluid balance. It also assists in the maintenance of healthy red and white blood cells, which is important for overall health. Vitamin B6 promotes normal hemoglobin synthesis (hemoglobin is the protein portion of red blood cells which carries oxygen throughout the body). Because vitamin B6 is involved in the synthesis of neurotransmitters in the brain and nerve cells, it has been recommended as a nutrient to support mental function, specifically mood. Athletic supplements often include vitamin B6 because it promotes the conversion of glycogen to glucose for energy in muscle tissue. Vitamin B6, when taken with folic acid, has been shown to help maintain normal plasma levels of homocysteine, which promotes optimal cardiovascular health. Vitamin B6 should be taken as a part of a complex of other B vitamins for best results.*

Hyaluronic Acid (Sodium Hyaluronate): 7.5 mg
Hyaluronic acid or hyaluronate is a glycosaminoglycan distributed widely throughout connective, epithelial and neural tissues, and is commonly used in skin care products. It is one of the main constituents of the extracellular matrix and it promotes healthy cell proliferation and migration. Plentiful in extracellular matrices, hyaluronic acid supports healthy tissue hydrodynamics, movement and production of cells, and promotes a number of cell surface receptor interactions. Because hylauronic acid is found mostly in the skin and cartilage, it supports joint health. It has also been suggested that hyaluronic acid promotes healthy cartilage cells.*

Hyaluronic acid may also support normal healing.*

Riboflavin (Vitamin B2): 4.5 mg
Vitamin B2 is a water-soluble vitamin that promotes the normal processing of amino acids and fats, activation of vitamin B6 and folic acid, and supports the conversion of carbohydrates into the fuel the body runs on, adenosine triphosphate (ATP). It also promotes healthy red blood cell formation, supports the nervous system, respiration, antibody production and normal human growth.*

Thiamin HCl (Vitamin B1): 3.5 mg
Thiamin promotes normal carbohydrate metabolism and nerve function. Thiamin is required for a healthy nervous system, and supports the production of certain neurotransmitters which have an important role in muscle function. It supports the digestive process, increases energy and helps promote mental clarity.*

Zinc (Lactate): 3.75 mg
Zinc is an essential mineral that is a component of more than 300 enzymes that support normal healing, fertility in adults and growth in children, protein synthesis, cell reproduction, vision, immune function, and protection against free radicals, among other functions.* 

Folate [as (6S)-5-methyltetrahydrofolic acid, glucosamine salt, Quatrefolic®]: 837 mcg
Folic acid is mainly found in fruits and vegetables. Dark, leafy greens, oranges, orange juice, beans, peas and Brewer’s yeast are the best sources. Folic acid plays a key role by boosting the benefits of B12 supplementation. These two B vitamins join forces and work together to help maintain normal red blood cells. Folic acid assists in the normal utilization of amino acids and proteins, as well as supporting the construction of the material for DNA and RNA synthesis, which is necessary for all bodily functions. Scientific studies have found that when working in tandem with folic acid, B12 is capable of promoting normal homocysteine levels. This works toward supporting a healthy cardiovascular and nervous system.*

Folic acid (folate) must go through a series of chemical conversions before it becomes metabolically active to be properly utilized. Folinic acid is the highly bioavailable, metabolically active derivative of folic acid. It does not require the action of the enzyme dihydrofolinate reductase to become active, so it's not affected by substances and herbs that inhibit this enzyme. Some people have a genetic variation (in the MTHRF gene) that reduces the amount of activated folic acid in the body. Folinic acid, unlike folic acid, is not negatively impacted by this genetic variation.*

Quatrefolic® is the glucosamine salt of (6S)-5-methyltetrahydrofolate, the most active form of folate, as it is structurally analogous to the reduced and active form of folic acid. Because this form is naturally present in the body, it is much more bioavailable for its biological action without having to be metabolized in the body.* 

Quatrefolic® is the registered trademark of Gnosis S.p.A. and is protected by U.S. Patent No. 7,947,662.

Vitamin A (20% beta-carotene): 600 mcg RAE
Vitamin A is a fat-soluble vitamin. Sources of vitamin A include organ meats (such as liver and kidney), egg yolks, butter, carrot juice, squash, sweet potatoes, spinach, peaches, fortified dairy products and cod liver oil. Vitamin A is also part of a family of compounds including retinol, retinal and beta-carotene. Beta-carotene, also known as pro-vitamin A, can be converted into vitamin A when additional levels are required. All of the body’s tissues need Vitamin A to support normal growth and repair. Vitamin A helps to promote healthy vision and normal bone growth and supports an antioxidant defense and a healthy immune system.* 

Taking beta-carotene by mouth along with vitamin C, vitamin E, and zinc daily, seems to support eye health. *

Biotin: 525 mcg
Biotin is a part of the B-vitamin family. The B-vitamins are important co-factors, which promote the normal metabolism of fats, carbohydrates and protein. Natural food sources of biotin include egg yolk, peanuts, beef liver, milk (10 mcg/cup), cereals, almonds and Brewer's yeast. Biotin operates as an important part of several enzymes, acting as a co-enzyme implicated in energy metabolism (such as pyruvate carboxylase). In the intestines, bacteria makes a negligible amount of biotin that may be assimilated and used by the body. The main roles of Biotin include promoting strong hair and nails, increasing energy levels, helping maintain normal cholesterol levels and helping to maintain healthy blood sugar levels.*

Methylcobalamin (Vitamin B12): 126 mcg
Vitamin B12 (cobalamin) is a bacterial product naturally found in animal products, especially organ meats, such as liver, with small amounts derived from peanuts and fermented soy products, such as miso and tempeh. It is essential that vegetarians consume a vitamin B12 supplement to maintain optimal health. Vitamin B12, when ingested, is stored in the liver and other tissues for later use. It supports the normal maintenance of cells, especially those of the nervous system, bone marrow and intestinal tract. Vitamin B12 supports normal homocysteine metabolism (homocysteine is an amino acid that is formed within the body). Normal homocysteine levels are important for maintaining cardiovascular health. Deficiencies of the vitamins folic acid, pyridoxine (B6) or cobalamin (B12) can result in elevated levels of homocysteine. Folate and B12, in their active coenzyme form help to maintain healthy blood levels of homocysteine.*

Methylcobalamin is one of the naturally-occurring forms of vitamin B12 found in the human body. The liver must convert cyanocobalamin, the form of B12 most commonly used in supplements, into methylcobalamin, before it can be properly utilized by the body; methylcobalamin is more effective than non-active forms of vitamin B12. Methylcobalamin also assists in the formation of SAMe (S-adenosylmethionine), a nutrient that has powerful mood-elevating properties.*

Iodine (Potassium Iodide): 75 mcg
Iodine is found in most seafood and in iodized salt. The trace element supports more than a hundred enzyme systems such as energy production, nerve function and hair and skin growth. One of iodine's main functions includes supporting the thyroid gland in producing thyroid hormones thyroxin and tri-iodothyronine, which help regulate and maintain a properly functioning metabolism.*

Vitamin D3 (Cholecalciferol): 25 mcg (1000 IU)
Regular sunlight exposure is the main way that most humans obtain vitamin D. Food sources of vitamin D include vitamin D-fortified milk (100 IU per cup), cod liver oil, fatty fish (such as salmon) and small amounts are found in egg yolks and liver.*

Vitamin D promotes the absorption of calcium and phosphorus and supports the production of several proteins involved in calcium absorption and storage. Vitamin D works with calcium to promote bone strength. It promotes the normal transport of calcium out of the osteoblasts into the extra-cellular fluid and in the kidneys. It promotes calcium and phosphate re-uptake by renal tubules. Vitamin D also promotes the absorption of dietary calcium and phosphate uptake by the intestinal epithelium. It supports the normal growth of skin cells.*

*These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product(s) is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

Science

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Isotonix essentials women's health

on 09/23/2017

i just start to use this Isotonix new women health product, the taste was really good and feel more more energy after taking a week. great recommended to every women keep the body stay healthy.

Love this!

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on 09/13/2017

Love the new Women's Essentials. Especially love the taste. I would like to see selenium added to the mix for cancer prevention.

Love this for women!

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on 09/02/2017

I just started taking this formula for women. It has everything I want/need. I had my Gene SNP done and it shows I do not convert beta-carotene to Vitamin A well. This has Vitamin A in it. It also showed I don't convert B6 and B12 well. This has the activated B vitamins in it. Plus the calcium, OPC's, magnesium, etc. And I will admit that it's really so easy just tearing open the single serving packets.